Chapter 4 Access to justice and the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) - an Australian perspective
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The over-representation of people with neuro-disabilities and acquired brain injury suggest that criminal justice processes are characterised by entrenched and systemic discrimination on the basis of disability. As a party to the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) Australia accepts the obligation to ensure that people with disabilities, including those with neuro-disabilities and acquired brain injury, are able to access and participate in criminal justice processes on an equal basis with others. This chapter considers recent Australian responses to the access justice debates in light of the access to justice obligations in the CRPD. It argues that the CRPD invites us to adapt and implement procedural justice reforms in a way that will promote the equal participation of those with disabilities and limit the opportunity for discrimination on the basis of disability.

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