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John E. King

For most economists, ‘Austrian economics’ refers to a distinct school of thought, originating with Mises and Hayek and characterised by a strong commitment to free-market liberalism. This innovative book explores an alternative Austrian tradition in economics. Demonstrating how the debate on the economics of socialism began in Austria long before the 1930s, it analyses the work and impact of many leading Austrian economists through a century of Austrian socialist economics.
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The Economics of War

Profiteering, Militarism and Imperialism

Imad A. Moosa

Bad things occur and persist because of the presence of powerful beneficiaries. In this provocative and illuminating book, Imad Moosa illustrates the economic motivations behind the last 100 years of international conflict, citing the numerous powerful individual and corporate war profiteers that benefit from war.
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A Modern Guide to State Intervention

Economic Policies for Growth and Sustainability

Edited by Nikolaos Karagiannis and John E. King

A Modern Guide to State Intervention investigates the impact of the changing role of the state, offering an alternative political economy for the third decade of the twenty-first century. Building on important factors including history, the role of institutions, society and economic structures, this Modern Guide considers economic and administrative interventions towards changing the destabilized status quo of modern societies.
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The Political Economy of Central Banking

Contested Control and the Power of Finance, Selected Essays of Gerald Epstein

Gerald Epstein

Central banks are among the most powerful government economic institutions in the world. This volume explores the economic and political contours of the struggle for influence over the policies of central banks such as the Federal Reserve, and the implications of this struggle for economic performance and the distribution of wealth and power in society.
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Trent J. MacDonald

Territorial political organisation forms the backbone of western liberal democracies. However, political economists are increasingly aware of how this form of government neglects the preferences of citizens, resulting in dramatic conflicts. The Political Economy of Non-Territorial Exit explores the theoretical possibility of ‘unbundling’ government functions and decentralising territorial governance.
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Deglobalization 2.0

Trade and Openness During the Great Depression and the Great Recession

Peter A.G. van Bergeijk

Deglobalization 2.0 argues that Trump and Brexit are the symptoms, and not the causes, of a long sequence of alternating phases of globalization and deglobalization driven by increasing income inequality and the retreat from the global stage by a contested hegemon. Providing rich empirical details, Peter van Bergeijk investigates similarities and differences between the Great Depression of the 1930s and the Great Recession and its aftermath of a slowdown in global trade. Providing an overview of recent findings and a discussion of contributions from several disciplines, the book investigates scenarios for the future of the economic world order and proposes possible solutions.
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Edited by Jonathan Michie

The past 30 years are often depicted as an era of globalisation, and even more so with the recent rise of global giants such as Google and Amazon. This updated and revised edition of The Handbook of Globalisation offers novel insights into the rapid changes our world is facing, and how best we can handle them.
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The Ethics of Competition

How a Competitive Society is Good for All

Christoph Lütge

The concept of competition is frequently regarded with ambivalence. While its champions wholeheartedly endorse it for reasons of efficiency, critics believe competition undermines ethics. They denounce competitive thinking, call for modesty in profit-making, and rail against economisation. However, Christoph Lütge argues convincingly that intensified competition can work in favour of ethical goals, and that many criticisms of competition stem from an inadequate understanding of how modern societies and economies function. The author illustrates his view with examples from ecology, healthcare and education, and concludes with a call for more entrepreneurial spirit.