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Albert N. Link

This book is about inventions and innovation in U.S. Federal Laboratories. The inventions discussed are defined by the technology transfer mechanism known by the term invention disclosures and are innovations that are the output of the technology transfer process. The demonstrated positive relationships in the book's model are the groundwork for suggesting not only a rethinking of the extant empirical research, within the context of a knowledge production function but also a refocusing of U.S. technology policy in support of technology transfer from Federal Laboratories.
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Edited by Per Nilsen and Sarah A. Birken

The Handbook on Implementation Science provides an overview of the field’s multidisciplinary history, theoretical approaches, key concepts, perspectives, and methods. By drawing on knowledge concerning learning, habits, organizational theory, improvement science, and policy research, the Handbook offers novel perspectives from a broad group of international experts in the field representing diverse disciplines. The editors seek to advance implementation science through careful consideration of current thinking and recommendations for future directions.
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Edited by Attila Varga and Katalin Erdős

The Handbook on Universities and Regional Development offers a comprehensive and up-to-date insight into how academic institutions spur their surroundings. The volume sheds light on universities as regional development actors from a historical perspective by introducing institutional changes and discussing the interrelatedness of society, business and academia. It provides detailed investigations on various knowledge transfer mechanisms to help understand the diverse ways through which ideas and intellectual property can flow between universities and businesses. Detailed case studies from three continents (Europe, Asia, and America) demonstrate the highly contextual nature of the interactions between academia, industry and government.
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Zoltán J. Ács

This book presents some of Zoltán J. Ács’ most important contributions since the turn of the the new millennium, with a particular intellectual focus on the knowledge spillover theory of entrepreneurship. This approach was shaped by three major events: the rapid globalization that occurred in the first decade of the 21st century; research on the role institutions have played in economic development during the past few decades; and the spread of entrepreneurial activity around the world following the collapse of communism at the end of the 20th century. This entrepreneurial activity has given rise to many questions of theory, measurement and policy.
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Edited by Tüzin Baycan

The commercialization of academic knowledge is increasingly seen as a potential economic development model, particularly for improving the capabilities and economic performance of regions. This insightful volume investigates the emerging factors in knowledge commercialization from an international perspective and highlights research agendas and challenges to be met across academia, industry and government.
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The Regional Economics of Knowledge and Talent

Local Advantage in a Global Context

Edited by Charlie Karlsson, Börje Johansson and Roger R. Stough

The distinguished contributors advance the current research frontier in three novel directions which focus on: the role of human capital and talent for creativity, entrepreneurship and regional development; the role of institutions for the behaviour of firms and entrepreneurs; and the influence of the global context on the location, export and innovation behaviour of firms in a knowledge economy.
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Managing Open Innovation

Connecting the Firm to External Knowledge

André Spithoven, Peter Teirlinck and Dirk Frantzen

Open innovation is about firms’ external relations with other firms and organisations. It is a topic which has attracted an immense amount of attention, but which has also been heavily criticised due to the diversity of the ideas and fuzziness of its key concepts. To date, the bulk of the literature on open innovation draws on case study material to illustrate the operation of firms in an anecdotal way. By contrast, this book examines open innovation practices by using large-scale datasets and stresses their impact on firm performance. The authors examine four key issues: differences between firms in open innovation practices, public funding to enhance external relations, R & D outsourcing of firms, and the role of human resources in R & D and innovation.
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Foundations of the Knowledge Economy

Innovation, Learning and Clusters

Edited by Knut Ingar Westeren

This book presents new evidence concerning the influential role of context and institutions on the relations between knowledge, innovation, clusters and learning. From a truly international perspective, the expert contributors capture the most interesting and relevant aspects of knowledge economy.
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The Knowledge Economy at Work

Skills and Innovation in Knowledge Intensive Service Activities

Edited by Cristina Martinez-Fernandez, Ian Miles and Tamara Weyman

There has been a great deal of discussion on the knowledge economy, but much of this has been more a matter of rhetoric than serious analysis. This book is a pioneering effort to address this gap, using a range of methods and investigating knowledge-intensive service activities in many different sectors.
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The Capitalization of Knowledge

A Triple Helix of University–Industry–Government

Edited by Riccardo Viale and Henry Etzkowitz

This ground-breaking new volume evaluates the capacity of the triple helix model to represent the recent evolution of local and national systems of innovation. It analyses both the success of the triple helix as a descriptive and empirical model within internationally competitive technology regions as well as its potential as a prescriptive hypothesis for regional or national systems that wish to expand their innovation processes and industrial development. In addition, it examines the legal, economic, administrative, political and cognitive dimensions employed to configure and study, in practical terms, the series of phenomena contained in the triple helix category.