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Stephen Martin

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Edited by Julien Fouret, Rémy Gerbay and Gloria M. Alvarez

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Meg Kinnear

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Julien Fouret and Luiza Saldanha Pena Costa

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Edited by Julien Fouret, Rémy Gerbay and Gloria M. Alvarez

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Edited by Julien Fouret, Rémy Gerbay and Gloria M. Alvarez

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Edited by Julien Fouret, Rémy Gerbay and Gloria M. Alvarez

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Katalin Erdős and Attila Varga

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Valsamis Mitsilegas, Saskia Hufnagel and Anton Moiseienko

In an increasingly mobile and interconnected world, transnational crime – that is, crime that directly affects more than one country – is more prevalent than ever before. Against this background, transnational crime has become increasingly difficult to study, let alone counteract. Given its sheer diversity, the whole utility of thinking about transnational crime as a field of enquiry may appear questionable. Yet by focusing too closely on specialist areas of concern one risks missing the proverbial wood for the trees – that is, factors common to various strands of transnational crime and the shared challenges of addressing it. The objective of this Handbook is to serve as a guide for the exploration of major types of transnational crime and key geographical regions.

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Nicos Komninos, Anastasia Panori and Christina Kakderi

Smart cities emerge from collaboration technologies (IoT, social media, blockchain), data science and AI. The algorithmic logic, under which these technologies operate, can be much more effective if combined with other sources of intelligence available in cities, such as human intelligence, creativity and innovation, collective and collaborative intelligence within institutions or over platforms. Along this line of thought, the first part of the book brings together authors that discuss the academic establishment of the smart city paradigm as outcome of collaborative endeavour rather than algorithms and automation. The second part focuses on major technologies that allow collaborative initiatives to develop at large scale. Smart cities are a technological construct driven by information technologies and embedded smart objects, but also a complex cyber-physical system in which cities, knowledge processes, and digital technologies are blended to generate new solutions. The third part of the book looks into the governance of smart cities, and mainly how technologies and digital platforms allow for citizen engagement and the setting of collaboration networks that generate innovations for better cities.