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Michael C. LaBelle

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Michael C. LaBelle

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Michael C. LaBelle

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Christopher May

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Silvana Bartoletto

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James Henderson and Arild Moe

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Peter H. Sand

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Kenneth Boutin

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Michel Bauwens

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Ainsley Elbra and Richard Eccleston

Blatant corporate tax avoidance has attracted the ire of politicians, citizens and consumers the world over in recent years. Since the financial crisis of 2008, international taxation has become a mainstream political issue championed by social justice campaigners and the progressive press the world over. Globally, governments and intergovernmental organisations have announced a range of reforms designed to ensure that MNCs pay their ‘fair share’ of tax, while some of the world’s most powerful and profitable firms have been subjected to multibillion-dollar fines.