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Stephen Martin

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Katalin Erdős and Attila Varga

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Edited by Silvia Grandi, Christian Sellar and Juvaria Jafri

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Christian Sellar, Silvia Grandi and Juvaria Jafri

This chapter proposes the notion of geofinance/banking to engage in and advance debates in both financial and political geography. Therefore, the first section of this chapter summarizes key concepts in financial geography; the second section makes the case for looking at finance from a political geographical standpoint; the third expands on the notion of geofinance/banking; and the fourth and fifth sections discuss broader implications of this as a model to understand finance in the semi-peripheries.

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Christian Sellar, Silvia Grandi and Juvaria Jafri

The introduction describes the focus of the book as an exploration of the boundaries between political and financial geographies. Specifically, it interrogates linkages between the changing spatialities and policies of the state, the evolution of a globalizing financial system, and the consequences of this for people and firms. In so doing, it makes two key claims. First, more attention needs to be paid to areas in between the core of the financial system and the recent investigations of financial peripheries. Thus, it defines the geographical scope of the book as focused on semi-peripheral financial areas, that is, established industrial or emerging economies outside the financial centres of North America, North-Western Europe and East Asia where financial industries are established but do not have the same level of global influence as the core. Second, a focus on the semi-periphery enables us to better view the entanglement between globalizing finance and banks and larger geostrategic processes affecting the spatiality of the nation state.

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Hans Visser

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Hans Visser

The introduction sets out the aims of the book, which are to analyze Islamic finance within the context of the belief system and the world view underlying it and to discusses its limitations and the tension between Islamic ideals and the need to compete in the market place. To put the Islamic finance industry into perspective, some figures are given of its size and of the market share of Islamic banking in a number of countries.

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Hans Visser

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Hans Visser

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Hans Visser

This chapter is about the motives for Muslims to advocate the use of financial instruments that obey specific Islamic requirements. The movement for an Islamic economy and an Islamic financial system in particular, started in the second half of the nineteenth century with a new Islamic awakening but took a different turn after the First World War. A new impetus was given with the rise in oil wealth in a number of predominantly Muslim countries after the 1973–74 oil crisis. Other industries followed. The chapter concludes by highlighting the diversity of views among Muslims on the various forms of Islamization of the economy.