Browse by title

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 106 items :

  • Public Policy x
  • Business and Management x
  • All accessible content x
Clear All
This content is available to you

Jacob Torfing, Lotte Bøgh Andersen, Carsten Greve and Kurt K. Klausen

This content is available to you

Giliberto Capano and Edoardo Ongaro

This content is available to you

Jacob Torfing, Lotte Bøgh Andersen, Carsten Greve and Kurt K. Klausen

This content is available to you

Giliberto Capano and Edoardo Ongaro

Open access

Michael Barzelay

While public management has become widely spoken of, its identity and character is not well-defined. Such disparity is an underlying problem in developing public management within academia, and in the eyes of practitioners. In this book, Michael Barzelay tackles the challenge of making public management into a true professional discipline. Barzelay argues that public management needs to integrate contrasting conceptions of professional practice. By pressing forward an expansive idea of design in public management, Barzelay formulates a fresh vision of public management in practice and outlines its implications for research, curriculum development and disciplinary identity.
Open access

Michael Barzelay

This content is available to you

Colin C. Williams and Ioana A. Horodnic

This content is available to you

Colin C. Williams and Ioana A. Horodnic

This content is available to you

Chan S. Jung

This chapter provides conceptual explanations about goal and ambiguity separately. Then goal ambiguity in public management is explained in terms of definition, importance, and paradox. Goal ambiguity is defined as the extent to which a set of goals in a public program or an organization allows different interpretations in deciding work related to target, time limit, and external evaluation. Ambiguous goals can have negative effects throughout a program, an organization, and further on citizens and society and on public service performance. However, public managers must face dilemmatic situations between clear goals for (rational) managerial strategy and ambiguous goals for political need (e.g. interventions on the society versus broader political support), which is called the paradox of goal ambiguity. Then this chapter describes the plan of this book.

This content is available to you

Chan S. Jung