Browse by title

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 117 items :

  • Politics and Public Policy x
  • Social and Political Science 2016 x
  • All accessible content x
Clear All
This content is available to you

Alistair Cole and Renaud Payre

This content is available to you

Edited by Felicity Thomas

This content is available to you

Yuko Aoyama and Balaji Parthasarathy

This content is available to you

Hans Keman and Jaap J. Woldendorp

This content is available to you

Felicity Thomas

Migration is now firmly embedded as a leading global policy issue of the twenty-first century. While not a new phenomenon, it has altered significantly in recent decades, with changing demographics, geopolitics, conflict, climate change and patterns of global development shaping new types of migration. Such movement involves an increasingly diverse group of people, as well as shifting countries of origin, transit and destination in what is often a complex, multi-staged and at times lengthy process. This introductory chapter examines these changes and sets out the main themes underpinning the Handbook. The book is organised into six main sections: theories and models of migration; rights and deservingness; vulnerability and precarity; specific healthcare needs and priorities; healthcare provision; and transnational and diasporic networks. The chapters in the book are, in turn, underpinned by three common themes: (1) the intersectional nature of migration and health; (2) the broad neoliberal context within which many experiences of migration and health take place; and (3) the need to move beyond a ‘one-size fits all’ approach to health and healthcare to recognise how subjective perspectives, priorities and responses feed in to ideas about, and experiences relating to, health, treatment seeking and care.

This content is available to you

Nicholas R. Smith

This chapter develops a novel theoretical framework for assessing the competitiveness of the EU’s and Russia’s foreign policies towards Ukraine. First, the popular theoretical approaches found in the literature for both the EU and Russia are examined to justify the decision to employ a neoclassical realist-inspired framework. While constructivism is acknowledged as representing a potentially useful theoretical approach for analysing EU–Russian relations, its predominately philosophical focus coupled with its methodological weaknesses are deemed significant constraints on producing problem-driven research which offers policy-relevant insights. Second, the tradition of neoclassical realism is examined with a particular focus on its position at the juncture of the disciplines of International Relations and Foreign Policy Analysis. Due to its flexibility, neoclassical realism, it is argued, represents, of all the potential realist approaches, perhaps the most fruitful and practical approach for examining the complexities of EU–Russian relations in the context of Ukraine. Last, a novel version of neoclassical realism is constructed by choosing specific intervening variables – identity, perceptions and the domestic foreign policy-making process. Building on this, a specific competition–cooperation matrix is designed to help guide the evaluation of competition in the following empirical chapters.
This content is available to you

Hakan G. Sicakkan

The term ‘Eurosphere’ is of central importance if we want to properly understand the European public sphere, for without the Eurosphere a European public sphere cannot materialize. The Eurosphere is a concept that was invented by the European Union’s founding generation. They defined the phenomenon as the sphere of those who participate in the European integration processes actively, those who are directly affected by its consequences, and those who affect the integration process by expressing ‘solidarity with the European’. In other words, the Eurosphere is the vertical, top-down, trans-European communicative space of pro-EU and pro-diversity elites and citizens. It is a part of the larger public sphere of Europe. This chapter posits the constitutive role of the Eurosphere in the ongoing formation of a European public sphere. It first presents a brief history of the making of the Eurosphere by the founding fathers of the European Union. Next, linking the two terms causally in a pluralist agonistic perspective, the chapter argues that the Eurosphere has a constitutive role in the formation of the European public sphere. Then it identifies the public spaces, publics, social and political actors (adversaries) and political cleavages and agons that constitute the agonistic public sphere in a transnational setting. Finally, it suggests an analytical framework suited for studying the European public sphere.

This content is available to you

Edited by John Goddard, Ellen Hazelkorn, Louise Kempton and Paul Vallance

This content is available to you

Jesper Johnsøn