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Edited by Colin Jones

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Edited by Colin Jones

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Clive Kerridge

Experiential learning - learning by doing - has long been advocated as an effective pedagogy for knowledge retention and soft skills development, with the role of reflection recognised as a key ingredient. Good business simulations are used successfully in many environments and professions, including Higher Education. They are often enjoyed by students and facilitate the three types of learning: effective, cognitive and behavioural. We look at the benefits to students and instructors of including business simulations within blended learning study programmes; which type of ‘sim’ to choose and when to use it; what to do (and what not to do!) to ensure simulations, and the associated experiential learning, contribute to student engagement and effective learning in a business school context.

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Edited by Kathy Daniels, Caroline Elliott, Simon Finley and Colin Chapman

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Edited by Kathy Daniels, Caroline Elliott, Simon Finley and Colin Chapman

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Gama Perruci and Sadhana W. Hall

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Gama Perruci and Sadhana W. Hall

The last chapter of this book includes the reflections of the two co-authors on how to move forward as educators and pave the path for continued learning about leadership studies. It emphasizes key takeaways from the previous chapters. Readers will find different aspects of the book more valuable depending on their individual interests and level of experience and maturity in developing and implementing leadership programs. This chapter lays out the priorities that should inform all educators when teaching leadership.

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Gama Perruci and Sadhana W. Hall

In this chapter, we explore the intellectual development of leadership studies (e.g., the empirical study of leadership, the development of a leadership canon, leadership as a discipline) as a way to suggest different paths that educators might take in developing a leadership curriculum. There is no single formula for developing a rigorous curriculum to expand students’ knowledge of how leadership works. Academic strengths of educators as well as an institution’s traditions may influence the types of courses that are integrated into a leadership program. These choices must provide students with a deeper understanding of the concepts and literary contributions of the leadership canon. Every leadership program obviously will have a different history and reality that will shape the curricular choices that are made. The key to a vibrant leadership curriculum is to be intentional and rigorous in curricular development.

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Gama Perruci and Sadhana W. Hall

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Gama Perruci and Sadhana W. Hall

This chapter is designed to introduce educators to the interdisciplinary connections that have given rise to leadership studies. While many leadership programs trace their roots to student affairs offices, the current academic study of leadership is often housed in various academic departments. The chapter begins by engaging the reader in this question about the interdisciplinary teaching of leadership: Is it a dialogue of disciplines or a pedagogical tool for understanding human relations? Next, the chapter reviews the different approaches that educators have taken to advance the teaching of leadership, including pre-professional, liberal-arts, and topic-based programs. The chapter ends with a discussion about the dynamic of finding an academic home for leadership studies.