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Edited by Laura Hyatt and Stuart Allen

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Edited by Laura Hyatt and Stuart Allen

Technology plays a significant role in doctoral leadership studies providing a channel for teaching, learning, research, and administrative processes. Existing and new programs seek to leverage technology-mediated learning in order to provide access, convenience, enriched learning, and develop new pathways to achieve a doctorate. Advancing Doctoral Leadership Education Through Technology offers ideas, experiences, and practices relevant to doctoral faculty, chairs and directors, administrators, researchers, and doctoral students interested in learning and research in technology and leadership education.
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Edited by Laura Hyatt and Stuart Allen

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Leadership and Sexuality

Power, Principles and Processes

Edited by James K. Beggan and Scott T. Allison

Although both leadership and sexuality are important and heavily researched topics, there is little work that addresses the interaction of the two areas. Leadership and Sexuality: Power, Principles, and Processes is a scholarly synthesis of leadership principles with issues related to sexuality and sexual policy-making. The authors’ multi-disciplinary analysis of the topic examines sexuality in the context of many different kinds of leadership, exploring both the good and the bad aspects of leadership and sexuality.
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Richard T. Harrison, Claire M. Leitch and Maura McAdam

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Arik Röschke

The past decade has seen an increase in scholarly interest and expansion of literature on the topic of entrepreneurial leadership. However, this field of research lacks definitional clarity and appropriate tools to assess its characteristics. This chapter presents a review of research published in this field from 2003 to 2014, with the goal of clarifying the state of knowledge in the area. It also aims to reveal the evolution of entrepreneurial leadership. A content analysis of the existing body of literature in 21 peer-reviewed journal articles focused on entrepreneurial leadership and was conducted using the analytical tool Leximancer. This analysis reveals important changes in the evolution of research in entrepreneurial leadership. Early articles often separated the terms ‘entrepreneurship’ and ‘leadership’ when describing the construct of entrepreneurial leadership. More recent articles have merged the terms into ‘entrepreneurial leadership’. In addition, a keyword analysis displayed the relevance of leadership styles, traits, characteristics and behaviors in both periods 2003_2009 and 2012_2014. Moreover, this study reveals that a number of journals had published articles on the topic of ‘entrepreneurial leadership’. Only three journals were represented more than once. Variation also applies to the authors who published in this research domain; only a few authors appeared with high frequency. Overall, the analysis suggests an increased cross-fertilization and convergence between the fields of entrepreneurship and leadership.

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David Rae

This chapter sets out to explore the field of leadership development and its emerging contribution to sustainable entrepreneurship; why there is a need to develop research and effective practices in this area, and how this might be achieved. It studies the questions of how organisations can generate entrepreneurial leadership for their longer-term sustainability; how they can develop a sustained culture of entrepreneurship; and how they can facilitate people into leadership roles, which enable continuing innovation, development and growth. The research is based on four case studies developed from research with entrepreneurial leaders in selected organisations. The leaders had founded or led their organisations for significant periods, and built them up to achieve a level of success, scale and structure. Their organisations include private, ‘for-profit’, community, and social enterprise organisations, but all have a strong sense of ‘community’ identity and sustainability. The interpretation of the cases revealed the importance of the leaders’ principles and ethical values in articulating a vision for what the organisation could achieve. They practised deep community involvement to build trust, by connecting with individuals, families and groups. There is continual scanning for needs and possibilities for social innovation to address problems and create multiple forms of value, connecting latent resources to enact opportunities. Their approach to leadership is distinctive, rather than imitative of other organisations, whilst finding and growing human talent and social capital to develop the organisation is seen as essential for the future.