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Dirk Lindebaum

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Dirk Lindebaum

This chapter offers a comprehensive synthesis of the preceding chapters. It does so by mapping out the entire process of how each pathway to social control, with its unique characteristics, relates to specific emotions. Through a different approach to emotion regulation, the author suggests that this can eventually raise the possibility of a critical mass emerging for what is described as micro-emancipation of workers. However, the author emphasizes that it is the sense-making processes of workers that will eventually influence whether an effect will occur and, more importantly, how the effect manifests itself in the phenomenological world of workers.

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Dirk Lindebaum

This chapter outlines the theoretical and empirical findings associated with Gross’s widely used process model of emotion regulation. Building upon this, the chapter proceeds to explore specific emotion regulation strategies in order to show how they differentially apply to, and impact on, the two pathways to social control introduced in Chapter 2. Through detailed description, the chapter lays out what the current appraisal might look like for each emotion of interest in this book (shame, guilt, happiness, anger), which, in turn, gives rise to adverse psychological, physiological and social consequences. This is followed by suggestions as to how these emotions might be regulated differently (compared to the status quo) to alleviate these adverse consequences. However, consistent with the clarifications offered in Chapter 1, the author refrains from predicting what the ‘new’ consequences for workers might be – other than suggesting a lower likelihood of adverse consequences materializing if workers adopted these suggestions.

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Dirk Lindebaum

Emotion is often used by organisations to manipulate and repress workers. However, this repression can have adverse psychological and social consequences for them. This book articulates the pathways through which this repression occurs, and offers emotion regulation as a tool for workers to emancipate themselves from this repression and social control.
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Dirk Lindebaum

This chapter lays out how the social functions of emotion, or deviations from it, can be co-opted to serve as a means of social control. The term ‘emotion’ is defined consistent with the key construct emotion regulation and the notion of emancipation as featured in critical theory. The literature on the functions of emotion is also discussed, as well as how these functions manifest themselves across levels of analysis. These steps permit introducing the reader to two pathways of social control. This chapter features a range of vignettes to contextualize how each emotion in question can be used to control behaviour in organizations. Finally, the chapter joins these insights with the literature on critical theory to maintain that the social functions of emotion constitute a sophisticated system of repression, the seeing through of which can potentially spark within repressed workers a desire to emancipate themselves from these conditions.

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Marco Berti

This metaphor highlights the role of differences and contrapositions, showing how these can be used to describe discourses. Discourses are similar to maps because they are representational and generative, creating their own subjects; as with maps, discourses come in different scales and they are equally (re)produced by means of symbolic practices and artefacts. At the same time, the semantic tensions between the concepts help to highlight the complex and intertwined relationship between discourse, power, material reality and knowledge. Key words: cartography, power/knowledge, representation, scale of discourse, phronesis
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Marco Berti

The mask metaphor is employed to show that while discourses produce subjectivities and identities they can also produce ambiguity, superficiality, silence. Various forms of organizational silence are considered, ranging from individual acts to hegemonic repressions of identity. The metaphor also enables one to highlight the role of fashions and fads in organizational discourse, and to consider the vices and virtues of emptiness. Finally, the existence of powerful discourses which are build around an essential semantic void is considered. Key words: ambiguity, organizational silence, hegemony, management fashions, emptiness
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Marco Berti

Symbolic practices have a pivotal role in producing and preserving social patterns and organizational settings. However, it would be problematic to equate discourse and organization, since the latter requires more than mere talk to be substantiated and it is therefore useful to consider discourses as organizing devices that operate in conjunction with material elements that can be examined with approaches such as actor-network theory. At the same time, the ongoing production of social association does not happen in a void, since existing power/knowledge structures, embedded in discourse, constrain and enable these associations, suggesting the need to include a phronetic critical perspective in the analysis. The case of attempted reform in the Vatican is used as a concrete exemplification of the complex web of relationships. Key words: organizing, phronesis, critical discourse analysis, actor-network theory, the Vatican
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Marco Berti

Rather than proposing a single definition of organizational discourse this chapter starts by reviewing alternative taxonomies that have been proposed to account for the multiple varieties of organizational discourse analysis that have emerged in literature. Some of the ontological and epistemological challenges encountered by discourse analysts are then discussed. To address these problems a new interpretative model which connects materiality and discourse is proposed, building on the concept of affordances. Key words: organizational discourse, varieties of discourse, ontology, affordances, materiality
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Marco Berti

Our knowledge and understanding of organizations is both enabled and constrained by invisible relationship of power that are embedded in the ways in which we act and speak. The notion of discourse has been used by many authors to describe and study these phenomena, and this volume offers a succinct but comprehensive introduction to the vast field of critical organizational discourse analysis. Targeted at graduate and doctoral students, and at non-specialist academic who need to familiarize with the academic debate on the subject, the book harnesses the power of metaphors to describe the many faces of discourse.