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Dimo Dimov

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Dimo Dimov

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Morten Huse

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Clive Kerridge

Experiential learning - learning by doing - has long been advocated as an effective pedagogy for knowledge retention and soft skills development, with the role of reflection recognised as a key ingredient. Good business simulations are used successfully in many environments and professions, including Higher Education. They are often enjoyed by students and facilitate the three types of learning: effective, cognitive and behavioural. We look at the benefits to students and instructors of including business simulations within blended learning study programmes; which type of ‘sim’ to choose and when to use it; what to do (and what not to do!) to ensure simulations, and the associated experiential learning, contribute to student engagement and effective learning in a business school context.

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Edited by Kathy Daniels, Caroline Elliott, Simon Finley and Colin Chapman

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Edited by Kathy Daniels, Caroline Elliott, Simon Finley and Colin Chapman

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Anne Vorre Hansen and Sabine Madsen

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John A. Davis and Mark A. Farrell

With a reduction in government funding universities, and with over 17,000 universities for students to choose from, the competition in higher education has never been fiercer. In this chapter we examine the nature of competition in higher education, with particular reference to status competition and positional goods. Prestigious universities enjoy a similar status to luxury brands, with constant demand from a hungry market keen to share the brand association. Conversely, lesser know institutions do not enjoy the same cachet. We also examine how university rankings shape reputation and how reputation shapes rankings, often leading to perverse incentives.
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John A. Davis and Mark A. Farrell

With a competitive higher education sector, and students forced to pay more for their education, it is inevitable that students, their parents and other stakeholders will begin to view universities as providers and students as consumers. In this chapter we examine the metaphor of student as consumer and how this affects the staff/student relationship. We also discuss the importance of customer satisfaction as a metric for assisting universities to become more competitive, and how increasing customer/student satisfaction can lead to significant benefits for universities.