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Elin M. Oftedal and Lene Foss

This chapter discusses how responsible start-ups are met in the health sector. Through following three companies, Voco, Cora and Medicus, we acquire insight into the world of challenges the entrepreneurs have when they introduce their technology/service to the healthcare sector. Using institutional theory, we look at the regulative, normative and cognitive dimension of the institutional framework. We use the term ‘institutional wall’ to denote a dense network of formal laws and regulation, informal norms and knowledge and beliefs that act as barriers for the entrepreneurs to access the market. We find that while there is a positive development in the regulative dimension: both the regulative and the normative dimension are set up to favour larger companies. The founders’ responses to the cognitive dimension indicate a lack of belief in Norwegian technology and thus tough access to finance.

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Ella Henry and Léo-Paul Dana

This chapter draws together the social entrepreneurship, social capital and cultural capital literature to inform the analysis of a research project in New Zealand, that has incorporated Māori Indigenous researchers, a Māori social enterprise, and its local community facing extreme challenges. The authors argue that social enterprise delivers more than business activity, whether they are for-profit or non-profit. Indigenous social enterprise and social entrepreneurs also bring together Indigenous communities, to work collaboratively for cultural revitalisation and social change. Further, the chapter explores the role of Māori/Indigenous researchers, and Indigenous research methodologies, in contributing to that cultural revitalisation and social change. This case illustrates how social entrepreneurs and researchers, who share cultural capital (in this case, the shared values and world view of an Indigenous people), might work collaboratively to enhance the social capital of the enterprise, and the community.

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Jill Kickul, David Gras, Sophie Bacq and Mark Griffiths

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Jill Kickul, David Gras, Sophie Bacq and Mark Griffiths

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Jill Kickul, David Gras, Sophie Bacq and Mark Griffiths

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All these entrepreneurs

To Act as if and Make a Difference

Björn Bjerke and Mathias Karlsson

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The carrying out of the Research Project

To Act as if and Make a Difference

Björn Bjerke and Mathias Karlsson

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Different kinds of citizen entrepreneurs

To Act as if and Make a Difference

Björn Bjerke and Mathias Karlsson

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Björn Bjerke and Mathias Karlsson

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Media cultures – yesterday, today and tomorrow?

To Act as if and Make a Difference

Björn Bjerke and Mathias Karlsson