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Michael E. Milakovich and Jean-Marc Wise

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Michael E. Milakovich and Jean-Marc Wise

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Michael E. Milakovich and Jean-Marc Wise

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Michael E. Milakovich and Jean-Marc Wise

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Michael E. Milakovich and Jean-Marc Wise

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Michael E. Milakovich and Jean-Marc Wise

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Michael E. Milakovich and Jean-Marc Wise

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Michael E. Milakovich and Jean-Marc Wise

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Clive Kerridge

Experiential learning - learning by doing - has long been advocated as an effective pedagogy for knowledge retention and soft skills development, with the role of reflection recognised as a key ingredient. Good business simulations are used successfully in many environments and professions, including Higher Education. They are often enjoyed by students and facilitate the three types of learning: effective, cognitive and behavioural. We look at the benefits to students and instructors of including business simulations within blended learning study programmes; which type of ‘sim’ to choose and when to use it; what to do (and what not to do!) to ensure simulations, and the associated experiential learning, contribute to student engagement and effective learning in a business school context.

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Edited by Kathy Daniels, Caroline Elliott, Simon Finley and Colin Chapman