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Stephen Martin

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Stephen Martin

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Stephen Martin

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Jöran Wrana, Moritz Breul and Javier Revilla Diez

MNEs’ subsidiaries in Vietnam are confronted by a dramatic skill mismatch on the labor market. In recent years, a couple of MNEs have set up collaborations with local universities through sponsoring of scholarships, equipment donations and training programs as part of their Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR). The goal of this chapter is to examine to what extent MNEs act as institutional entrepreneurs through CSR projects at partnering universities, thereby contributing towards an upgrading of Vietnam’s higher education system. Data have been derived on the basis of 25 in-depth interviews with firm managers and university representatives as well as secondary statistical data. The authors draw the following conclusions. First, the largest benefits of CSR projects are shared between the directly involved partners. Second, the diffusion of skills and technologies across the different departments and institutes within the cooperating university is substantially small.

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Sheila Slaughter and Barrett J. Taylor

In the US, trustees have linked universities to industry for at least a century. We extend existing research on this topic by exploring the ways in which “The Great Recession” reshaped trustee-mediated relationships between university and industry. We analyze university trustees’ ties to corporations at two elite universities, the University of Pittsburgh and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), by considering the number and type of affiliations that trustees held before (2005), during (2010) and after (2015) the Recession. Findings suggest that trustees of both universities remained highly connected to firms even after the Recession. However, MIT’s position was far stronger than Pitt’s after the Recession, as indicated by total ties and by the types of firms to which trustees linked the two universities. This indicated that university governance in the US reflects not only economic conditions but also factors within the field of higher education such as institutional stratification.

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Nathan M. Sorber

The Morrill Act of 1862 created the American land-grant universities and reshaped higher education in the United States. The legislation greatly expanded the number of public universities in the nineteenth century, creating the foundation of leading global universities like Cornell University, the University of California, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Pennsylvania State University, and the University of Wisconsin. This chapter traces land-grant universities evolving role in national, state, and regional development from origins until today through four domains: the national development framework, the local development framework, the human capital framework, and emergent frameworks in an era of privatization and commercialization. The chapter highlights the critical role that land-grant teaching, research, and knowledge dissemination have had on economic development strategies in the United States.

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Katalin Erdős and Attila Varga

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Andrew Johnston and Robert Huggins

This chapter explores the interrelationship between the concept of geographic proximity and the more relational concepts of networks and innovation systems from the perspective of university-industry linkages. It focuses on linkages that are knowledge-based, and draws specifically on an analysis of the linkages universities form with firms in knowledge-intensive business service sectors (KIBS). Its arguments and conclusions draw upon both an in-depth critique of the key literature and an empirical analysis of the effects of different locational environments on the spatiality of the linkages formed between universities and KIBS firms. The key results of the study indicate the following: urban KIBS firms are generally located in much more competitive environments; urban KIBS firms tend to develop collaborative linkages with universities in much closer proximity than their rural counterparts; organisational proximity does not differ across firm types; and urban KIBS firms have different partner selection criteria to their rural counterparts.

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Harvey Goldstein, Verena Radinger-Peer and Sabine Sedlacek

Research universities fill a variety of roles within contemporary society (Goldstein et al., 1995). Arguably the most important role has been providing advanced education to a segment of the population so that they have the requisite know-how to enter the professions. A second has been to generate knowledge through research that leads to scientific progress over time and indirectly often leads to productivity growth in the economy. These have been the traditional missions of research universities since their founding in the late nineteenth century.

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Emily I. Nwakpuda and Maryann P. Feldman

In search of additional sources of revenue, universities and colleges have cultivated individual donors to provide support to academic projects and initiatives. Major gifts (of at least $100,000) from private donors are typically lost in an aggregation of all types of philanthropy, rather than being considered as their own separate category. This chapter provides evidence of the contributions of high net worth individuals to university programs, with a focus on donors’ support of scientific research. We have documented 4794 announced major gifts to 835 degree-granting institutions, from 4,381 donors between 1995 and 2004. Major gifts to create scientific research centers are highlighted, because these gifts are rare, understudied, and link individual donors to the economic and regional development associated with these research centers. These considerations are relevant to modern institutions seeking to leverage high net worth donors, as major sources of scientific research and development funding are currently under threat.