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Stephen Wilks

The large business corporation has become a governing institution in national and global politics. This trail-blazing book offers a critical account of its political dominance and lack of democratic legitimacy. Thanks to successful wealth generation and ideological victories the large business corporation has become an effective political actor and has entered into partnership with government in the design of public policy and delivery of public services. Stephen Wilks argues that governmental and corporate elites have transformed British politics to create a ‘new corporate state’ with similar patterns in the USA, in competitor economies – including China – and in global governance. The argument embraces multinational corporations, corporate social responsibility, corporate governance and the inequality generated by corporate dominance.
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Edited by John Farrar and David G. Mayes

The recent global financial crisis has challenged conventional wisdom, and our conception of globalisation has been called into question. This challenging and timely book revisits the relationship between globalisation, the crisis and the state from an interdisciplinary perspective, with law, economics and political science underpinning the analysis.
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The Dynamics of Global Economic Governance

The Financial Crisis, the OECD, and the Politics of International Tax Cooperation

Richard Eccleston

This book focuses on international taxation and examines how the financial crisis prompted renewed attempts to enhance international tax transparency and confront tax havens. It highlights the complexity of international regime change and the significance of national and financial interests, international organizations, domestic politics and the emerging G20 leaders forum in this process.
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Kristian Coates Ulrichsen

This insightful research review examines the internal and external transformation of the Arab Gulf states and their repositioning within the global order. It explores the interlocking challenges of transition toward post-rentier structures of governance and assesses the domestic, regional and global implications. A multi-level approach begins with sections on domestic political and economic reform and the reformulation of domestic agendas to reflect new issues such as climate-change. Subsequent sections cover the evolution of regional security agendas, new trends in foreign policy and the Arab Gulf states’ rapid emergence as global actors and provide a frank portrayal of this dynamic region.
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Edited by Georgina Murray and John Scott

Several expert contributors focus on global issues, including the role of transnational finance, interlocking directorates, ownership and tax havens. Others examine how these issues at the global level interact with the regional or nation state level in the US, the UK, China, Australia and Mexico. The books scrutinizes globalization from a fresh, holistic perspective, examining the relationship between the national and transnational to uncover the most significant structures and agents of power. Possible policy futures are also considered.
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David A. Baldwin

This collection comprises important articles on key concepts in understanding the global economy. Professor Baldwin has selected papers, written by leading academics, which cover governance, diffusion, democracy, domestic affairs, immigration, conflict, sanctions, trade and finance. This research review will be of great value to students, academics and practitioners interested in the field of the new global economy.
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Japan’s Great Stagnation

Forging Ahead, Falling Behind

W. R. Garside

This timely book presents a critical examination of the developmental premises of Japan’s high-growth success and its subsequent drift into recession, stagnation and piecemeal reform. The country, which within a few decades of wartime defeat mounted a serious challenge to American hegemony, appeared incapable of fully adjusting to shifting economic circumstance once the impulses of catch-up growth and the good fortune of an accommodating international environment faded.
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The Limits of Regulation

A Critical Analysis of Capitalist Development

Stavros Mavroudeas

This unique and original book offers a critical survey of the regulation approach, an influential theoretical school born in the 1970s and belonging to the neo-Marxist and radical political economy traditions.
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Political Governance of Capitalism

A Reassessment Beyond the Global Crisis

Helmut Willke and Gerhard Willke

This path-breaking book highlights that systemic risks emerge from a globally operating financial industry that is not only disconnected from the real economy but also allowed to hide in ‘shadow banking’ practices. Governance based on national regimes fails to cover ‘finance-led’ global capitalism. The authors argue that the risk of systemic meltdown will reappear unless intelligent governance regimes are installed, combining legally binding rules and civil society pressures to restore the balance between risk-taking and accountability. They illustrate the goal is ‘resilient’ capitalism in which the rules of the game are set by politics and knowledge-based discourse.
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States, Banks and Crisis

Emerging Finance Capitalism in Mexico and Turkey

Thomas Marois

Thomas Marois’ groundbreaking interpretation of banking and development in Mexico and Turkey builds on a Marxian-inspired framework premised on understanding states and banks as social relationships alongside crisis and labor as vital to finance today. The book’s rich historical and empirical content reveals definite institutionalized relationships of power that mainstream political economists often miss.