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Cybercrime in the Greater China Region

Regulatory Responses and Crime Prevention Across the Taiwan Strait

Lennon Yao-chung Chang

Cybercrime is a worldwide problem of rapidly increasing magnitude and, of the countries in the Asia Pacific region, Taiwan and China are suffering most. This timely book discusses the extent and nature of cybercrime in and between Taiwan and China, focussing especially on the prevalence of botnets (collections of computers that have been compromised and used for malicious purposes).
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Lothar Determann

Companies, lawyers, privacy officers, developers, marketing and IT professionals face privacy issues more and more frequently. Much information is freely available, but it can be difficult to get a grasp on a problem quickly, without getting lost in details and advocacy. This is where Determann’s Field Guide to International Data Privacy Law Compliance comes into its own – helping to identify issues and provide concise practical guidance in an increasingly complex field shaped by rapid change in international laws, technology and society.
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Breach of Confidence

Social Origins and Modern Developments

Megan Richardson, Michael Bryan, Martin Vranken and Katy Barnett

This concise yet detailed book explores the historical foundations and modern developments of the ancient doctrine of breach of confidence. The authors show that despite its humble beginnings, stilted development and air of quaintness the doctrine has modern relevance and influence, its sense of ‘trust and confidence’ still resonating with the information society of today. Topical chapters include, ‘Inventing an equitable doctrine’, ‘Privacy and publicity in early Victorian Britain’, ‘Searching for balance in the employment relationship’, as well as many others.
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Virtual Economies and Financial Crime

Money Laundering in Cyberspace

Clare Chambers-Jones

Clare Chambers-Jones examines the jurisprudential elements of cyber law in the context of virtual economic crime and explains how virtual economic crime can take place in virtual worlds. She looks at the multi-layered and interconnected issues association with the increasing trend of global and virtual banking via the ‘Second Life’ MMOG (Massively Multiplayer Online Game). Through this fascinating case study, the author illustrates how virtual worlds have created a second virtual economy which transgresses into the real, creating economic, political and social issues. Loopholes used by criminals to launder money through virtual worlds (given the lack of jurisdictional consensus on detection and prosecution) are also highlighted.