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Introduction and overview

Using Foreign Aid to Delegate Global Security

Jean-Paul Azam and Véronique Thelen

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The problem of imported attacks

Using Foreign Aid to Delegate Global Security

Jean-Paul Azam and Véronique Thelen

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Targets and perpetrators of transnational terrorist attacks

Using Foreign Aid to Delegate Global Security

Jean-Paul Azam and Véronique Thelen

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Testing the impacts of foreign aid and military interventions

Using Foreign Aid to Delegate Global Security

Jean-Paul Azam and Véronique Thelen

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Why suicide terrorists get educated

Using Foreign Aid to Delegate Global Security

Jean-Paul Azam and Véronique Thelen

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Edited by Dongchul Cho, Takatoshi Ito and Andrew Mason

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Inho Song

Inho Song examines aging as a structural factor affecting housing prices. His long-term price model, using a model of demographic structure by age group, simulates the trend of housing prices, assuming that Korea’s housing market may experience aging similar to Japan’s over the next 20 years. Results show a downturn from 2019 (annualized growth rates of –1 to –2 percent) in real housing prices, but a rise in nominal ones (by an annual average 0.4 percent), even with effects of population aging. Results are consistent with the lifecycle hypothesis and overlapping generation models, in that aging has a direct impact on asset prices. Korea’s housing market has not yet experienced the aging effects that Japan’s has. Inflation in housing prices will be the factor deciding whether population aging effects on the housing market in Korea will be similar to those in Japan.

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Jerry Schiff and Ikuo Saito

Recent global economic stagnation has stimulated debate about the role of fiscal policy in supporting growth, notably through infrastructure spending. Japan’s experience during its “Lost Decades” provides insights on maximizing the impact of fiscal policy during downturns. First, while Japan provided early and effective fiscal stimulus, later fiscal policy was conducted in a “stop-and-go” and often pro-cyclical manner. Second, a shift in spending away from infrastructure toward transfers reduced the overall fiscal multiplier. Third, a decline in the efficiency of public investment—partly reflecting weaknesses in fiscal institutions—also reduced the impact of fiscal policy. Fourth, the concurrent dramatic shift in demographics reduced potential growth and limited fiscal space, so that fiscal policy was fighting against a strong tide. Avoiding similar problems can help countries design effective fiscal policy responses in the current economic environment.

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Conclusions

An Institutional Critique

Frank H. Stephen

The final chapter of the book reviews conclusions to be drawn from the New Institutional Economics-driven analysis of the role of laws and the legal system in the process of development presented in the preceding chapters. It uses the criteria outlined in Chapter 1 to evaluate the model. It is concluded that the NIE-based model avoids the problems of modernization theory and is free from ethnocentrism. The NIE-based model also is suitable for evaluating the role of law and the legal system in the process of economic development. Finally, it has permitted an examination of law in action and not just the law on the books. The chapter concludes with a summary of the lessons for policymaking which the book provides.