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Yuko Aoyama and Balaji Parthasarathy

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Lorena Núñez Carrasco

Literature on issues relating to end-of-life care for migrants has been relatively limited, and what exists has been produced mostly in the Global North. In the Global South, not only there is a lack of formal and integrated responses to support end-of-life needs, but also a lack of literature that reflects on the particular needs faced by migrant populations. This chapter examines the situation of sick and dying migrants in South Africa, who are living in contexts characterised by high prevalence of HIV/AIDS, displacement, illegality, lack of social protection and poverty. The chapter explores the symbolic, emotional and material resources they mobilise and the role played by various actors providing end-of-life care to migrants. Central to the assistance provided are the collective efforts to make the return home possible. Despite such efforts, some migrants do ultimately die away from home. The chapter therefore also identifies the actors involved in managing a migrant’s death in a foreign country and examines their role in organising funerals and burials or an eventual repatriation of a body. Overall, this work focuses on the agents’ strategies to deal with the material, cultural, spiritual and practical needs that arise from sickness to avoid and to manage an eventual death out of place or far from home.

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Nicholas R. Smith

This book assesses the competitive and contentious EU–Russia relationship in relation to Ukraine from 2010 to 2013, focusing on the important areas of trade, energy and security. The key issue explored is whether this relationship played any meaningful role in the deterioration of the situation in Ukraine since late 2013.
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Nicholas R. Smith

This chapter represents a bridge chapter between the theoretical framework and the three ensuing empirical chapters on the sectors of trade, energy and security. The aim of the chapter is to undertake an assessment of the international and regional geopolitical environments in which the EU, Russia and Ukraine currently reside. First, the concept of power in International Relations is engaged with, with five key power dimensions in Eastern Europe identified: military, economic, energy, diplomatic and soft power. Second, a deeper examination of the altering international and regional European setting is undertaken, with a particular focus on what a multipolar international system with a bipolar Eastern Europe might entail. Third, a crude power calculation for both the international and European regional systems is presented with a strong focus on auditing the power of the EU and Russia. After that, the changing geopolitical setting is connected with an examination of the changing foreign policies of the EU and Russia over the past two decades. Last, it is argued that the impact of the international and regional systems on Ukraine, particularly its position between two larger powers in the EU and Russia, makes pursuing its long-held multi-vector foreign policy logic much more challenging.
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Lisa Benton-Short, Melissa Keeley and Jennifer Rowland

In recent years, US cities have begun to develop sustainability plans. The approach, content, and foci of these plans vary dramatically, and no template or articulated best practices exist for the creation of these plans. Green spaces such as parks, trees, and urban gardens can play a central role in sustainable planning exercises and the inclusion and use of urban green space in municipal planning is one way for municipalities to address multiple environmental, economic, and social sustainability issues simultaneously. We have utilized content analysis and coding of 20 municipal sustainability plans to gain insight into how US cities conceptualize urban green space. The chapter will examine the ways in which green space is organized in sustainability plans, the language used to discuss green space, how cities value the benefits that green spaces provide, and how cities integrate issues of social equity in green space planning. We conclude that many plans value green space for primarily environmental benefits, while issues of economic and social benefits and the equity with which they are distributed are less articulated. The chapter will also highlight selected best practices as a way to guide more effective green space planning. Keywords: best practices in planning, green space, parks, street trees, sustainability plans, urban gardens

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Kent E. Portney and Jeffrey M. Berry

In the face of more than 20 years of experience in the USA, cities continue to search for ways of dealing with the fact that sustainability and its pursuit, as a matter of local public policy, is often deeply contested. This chapter examines the role of local environmental groups in this contestation with a particular eye toward understanding the role of such groups in the context of the underlying political ideology of cities. Taking advantage of patterns across 50 of the largest cities in the USA, this chapter examines the roles of pro-sustainability groups both in terms of their co-production activities and their advocacy before city government, and makes inferences about the importance of such groups independent of how progressive or conservative the city is. Consistent with mainstream understandings of the role of groups, this chapter argues that local decisions to try to become more sustainable are shaped by the roles played by environmental groups. It concludes with the suggestion that the pursuit of sustainability policies and programs moving forward will depend in large part on the extent to which environmental groups are willing and able to engage in advocacy before city policy-makers.