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James Henderson and Arild Moe

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Imad A. Moosa

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Edited by John Kincaid

In this forward-thinking book, fifteen leading scholars set forth cutting-edge agendas for research on significant facets of federalism, including basic theory, comparative studies, national and subnational constitutionalism, courts, self-rule and shared rule, centralization and decentralization, nationalism and diversity, conflict resolution, gender equity, and federalism challenges in Africa, Asia, and the European Union. More than 40 percent of the world’s population lives under federal arrangements, making federalism not only a major research subject but also a vital political issue worldwide.
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John Dinan

Subnational constitutions, which are found in a number of federal systems, have attracted increasing scholarly interest. This chapter summarizes leading research in this area and identifies questions calling for additional inquiry, with a focus on three issues. First, significant progress has been made in mapping the legal dimensions of subnational constitutions and their interaction with national constitutions, but a better understanding is needed of the politics of subnational constitutions and the ways they play a meaningful part in governing. Second, scholars would benefit from additional inquiry into whether subnational constitutions can help accommodate ethnic or national pluralism, in view of recent efforts to craft subnational constitutions for this purpose. Additionally, scholars in this subfield should continue to pursue questions of general interest to comparative constitutional scholars, by benefiting from the opportunities and data that subnational constitutions provide for assessing the effects of choices regarding constitutional and institutional design.

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Alan Fenna

This chapter explores the possibilities and challenges of comparative analysis in federal studies, whether directed at greater understanding of the promise and impact of federalism or of the way federal systems operate and evolve. Examples from the existing literature illustrate the dilemmas of large-N versus small-N studies, the limits of case availability and issues of case selection, and the consequent rarity of robust findings. The chapter emphasizes the need for greater methodological rigour in future research and suggests a focus on topics with the greatest relevance to the challenges of the modern world.

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Telework in the 21st Century

An Evolutionary Perspective

Edited by Jon C. Messenger

Technological developments have enabled a dramatic expansion and also an evolution of telework, broadly defined as using ICTs to perform work from outside of an employer’s premises. This volume offers a new conceptual framework explaining the evolution of telework over four decades. It reviews national experiences from Argentina, Brazil, India, Japan, the United States, and ten EU countries regarding the development of telework, its various forms and effects. It also analyses large-scale surveys and company case studies regarding the incidence of telework and its effects on working time, work-life balance, occupational health and well-being, and individual and organizational performance.
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Jakob de Haan

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William C. Strange

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William C. Strange

This research review discusses some of the most essential papers encompassing agglomeration economies. Agglomeration economies are manifested in cities and industry clusters shaping the neighborhoods and the regions that contain them. The review analyses econometric methods and data improvements, geographic scales at which agglomeration economies operate, micro-neighborhoods and mega-regions. The author also uncovers the forces driving the field including labor markets, input markets and dynamic phenomena such as innovation, technology change and growth.
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Jakob de Haan

This essential research review carefully analyses some of the most influential papers focusing on the relationship between economic and political institutions and economic development. Economic institutions shape economic incentives, such the incentives to become educated, to save and invest, to innovate and to adopt new technologies. Although economic institutions are critical for determining whether a country is poor or prosperous, it is politics and political institutions that determine which economic institutions are present in a country. This review explores these critical relationships and the causes of economic growth, whilst bringing forth the legal, colonial and financial factors, which contribute to economic discrepancies across countries. The text will be a valuable tool for economic researchers and scholars interested in this important subject.