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Hossein Fazilatfar

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Edited by Jordi Jaria-Manzano and Susana Borrás

Climate change is causing traditional political and legal concepts to be revisited. The emergence of a global polity through physical, economic and social interaction demands global responses which should be founded upon new principles and which cannot simply be modelled on traditional constitutionalism centred on the nation-state. This Research Handbook explores how to build this climate constitutionalism at a global level, starting from the narrative of Anthropocene and its implications for law. It provides a critical approach to global environmental constitutionalism, analysing the problems of sustainability and global equity which are entwined with the causes and consequences of climate change. The Handbook explores how to develop constitutional discourses and strategies to address these issues, and thereby tackle the negative effects of climate change whilst also advancing a more sustainable, equitable and responsible global society.
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Victor P. Goldberg

Jacob and Youngs v. Kent has long been a staple in Contracts casebooks. This chapter makes three contributions. First, it demonstrates that Cardozo broke no new ground. The law involving willfulness and substantial completion in building contracts had been around for half a century. The recognition of value of completion when the cost substantially exceeded the value was also well established. Second, it examines the record and concludes that Cardozo’s decision was justified. In particular it resolves two puzzles: (a) why did both the majority and dissent ignore the condition that the architect provide a certificate of completion; and (b) why didn’t Kent counterclaim for the full cost of completion? Finally, it considers how modern contract forms produced by the American Institute of Architects deal with the problem of deviations.

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Victor P. Goldberg

In this series of chapters on contract damages issues, Victor P. Goldberg provides a framework for analyzing the problems that arise when determining damages, and applies it to case law in both the USA and the UK.
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Victor P. Goldberg

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Transnational Business Governance Interactions

Advancing Marginalized Actors and Enhancing Regulatory Quality

Edited by Stepan Wood, Rebecca Schmidt, Errol Meidinger, Burkard Eberlein and Kenneth W. Abbott

From agriculture to sport and from climate change to indigenous rights, transnational regulatory regimes and actors are multiplying and interacting with poorly understood effects. This interdisciplinary book investigates whether, how and by whom transnational business governance interactions (TBGIs) can be harnessed to improve the quality of transnational regulation and advance the interests of marginalized actors.
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Edited by Björn Lundqvist and Michal S. Gal

The digital economy is gradually gaining traction through a variety of recent technological developments, including the introduction of the Internet of things, artificial intelligence and markets for data. This innovative book contains contributions from leading competition law scholars who map out and investigate the anti-competitive effects that are developing in the digital economy.
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Edited by Isabelle Bosse-Platière and Cécile Rapoport

This timely book gives an overview of the main legal issues the EU faces in negotiating, concluding and implementing so-called ‘New Generation’ free trade agreements. Featuring contributions by international specialists on EU external action, this book demonstrates why these FTAs have become challenging for the EU, as well as analysing how the EU has dealt with its institutional constraints, and addresses contemporary debates and future challenges for EU institutions and Member States.
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Tawhida Ahmed and Elaine Fahey

This project has asked contributors to undertake a critical review of the ideas of justice and injustice as they relate to Brexit. The book has asked whose justice is affected by Brexit? What justice is affected by Brexit? What does a just society look like? Whether Brexit is perceived as one of justice or injustice is related strongly to our perspective of the kind of British, European and global society we want and envisage. This project has also asked how can a ‘just’ Brexit be evaluated from an intellectual and methodological perspective, in order to assess our understanding of whether and how national and global governance affect the pursuance of a just society? This has been underpinned by the unique circumstance of Brexit, which concerns the situation of withdrawal from globalisation, or more specifically, an exit of a state from an international organisation. The diverse contributions in the book have been useful in enabling the book to make some observations about the ways in which the topic of Brexit is approached, and what this may expose about our use of frameworks, concepts and methodologies of (legal) research on Brexit.

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Edited by Tawhida Ahmed and Elaine Fahey