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Mohd M. Billah, Ezzedine GhlamAllah and Christos Alexakis

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Mohd M. Billah, Ezzedine GhlamAllah and Christos Alexakis

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Mohd M. Billah, Ezzedine GhlamAllah and Christos Alexakis

The model of Islamic insurance policy is based on the principles of mutual cooperation, brotherhood and solidarity. This timely volume contradicts the widely-held belief that insurance policies oppose the teachings of Islam, exploring ways in which it coheres with Shari’ah law. The book explores Takaful, an insurance paradigm that is in accordance with Islamic principles and suits the needs of modern Islamic economies and communities.
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Mohd M. Billah, Ezzedine GhlamAllah and Christos Alexakis

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Mohd M. Billah, Ezzedine GhlamAllah and Christos Alexakis

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Dean V. Williamson

Do institutions matter in economic theory? Or is the economic analysis of institutions a distraction from the most important action? Indeed, does Vernon Smith’s notion of the “institution-free core” of formal economic theory encompass that most important action? To explore this question, this book opens with an informal tour of the economics of system design out of which an economics of adaptation ultimately emerged. The book then offers explorations, via the application of the economics of adaptation in both law and economics relating to how parties manage relationships within the firm, within the context of long-term contracts, and, most vividly, within the context of antitrust conspiracy.
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Dean V. Williamson

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Dean V. Williamson

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Religion and Finance

Comparing the Approaches of Judaism, Christianity and Islam

Mervyn K. Lewis and Ahmad Kaleem

Judaism, Christianity and Islam all impose obligations and constraints upon the rightful use of wealth and earthly resources. All three of these religions have well-researched views on the acceptability of practices such as usury but the principles and practices of other, non-interest, financial instruments are less well known. This book examines each of these three major world faiths, considering their teachings, social precepts and economic frameworks, which are set out as a guide for the financial dealings and economic behaviour of their adherents.