Browse by title

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 73 items :

  • Welfare States x
  • Social and Political Science 2016 x
Clear All
This content is available to you

Edited by Gary P. Freeman and Nikola Mirilovic

This content is available to you

Kati Kuitto

You do not have access to this content

Gunnar L.H. Svendsen and Gert T. Svendsen

As argued in Chapter 2, free-riding and defection do not escalate because of social sanctioning systems, resulting in win–win outcomes among agents when cooperation succeeds. High trust means that the risk of being cheated is low, as it is possible to predict the behavior of the other agent in relation to a norm. Arguably, a sufficient number of norm enforcers facilitate this unique collective insurance system. Measuring bridging social capital as social trust, our ranking of 86 countries showed that the Scandinavian welfare states (Denmark, Norway, Sweden and Finland) top the list. Based on Bourdieu’s approach to intangible capital, we derived a theoretical framework of Bourdieuconomics encompassing trust, social capital, and symbolic, cultural and physical capital that could all be converted to economic capital. Hence we argued that Bourdieu’s (1986) seminal idea of mutually convertible forms of tangible and intangible capital (economic, cultural, social, symbolic) can be united with a rational choice framework. The latter should however take seriously into consideration the high risks of labor time investments made by the single actor in complex situations rich in socio-economic considerations and strategies. Our contribution in this book was to fill a gap in the literature by focusing on real-life capital strategies in the universal welfare state of Denmark at the micro or local level, that is, in situ.
You do not have access to this content

Mariana Medina

You do not have access to this content

Christian Joppke and Tobias Eule

You do not have access to this content

Gunnar L.H. Svendsen and Gert T. Svendsen

Chapter 4 gave another example of civil society, namely a multifunctional meeting place and the kulturhus. Social capital is about people who meet, get to know each other and help each other in various ways. Therefore, it appears odd that discussions on meeting places and social capital are rare in the literature. This chapter therefore discussed such linkages in the Scandinavian welfare state, here termed socio-spatial planning. It raised the question: How can public meeting places facilitate the creation of bridging social capital? The chapter suggested that one possible way of securing regular, inter-group face-to-face meetings would be to establish multifunctional centers. Such buildings include: public services such as health care, schools, libraries; private enterprises such as grocers’ shops and banks; and facilities for local associations such as theatres and sports halls. Cases from the Netherlands and Denmark indicate that such large meeting places help counteract the segregation of various groups – be they ethnic, social or age. In this way, a well-functioning multifunctional center facilitates provision of the collective goods of integration, social trust and bridging social capital in the welfare state. Overall, Chapters 3 and 4 gave examples of the workings of social capital and its lubricator, trust, within the civil society.
You do not have access to this content

Gunnar L.H. Svendsen and Gert T. Svendsen

Chapter 3 then introduced civil society and looked at two local communities, namely Klitmøller and Karby. By the use of statistical, historical and fieldwork data from these two peripheral rural communities in Denmark, it was demonstrated how intangible capital in the form of social, organizational and cultural capital was used in situ, at the micro level. We suggested that the difference in economic performance between these two very similar communities – both high-trust communities – should be explained in their varying ability to capitalize upon local stocks of prevailingly intangible capital. Klitmøller manages well, as mirrored in population increase, which could be explained by numerous hard-riders and volunteers, an open inclusive culture and effective organizational capital. Karby suffers from a steady population decline and is managing less well, something we explained as a result of fewer hard-riders (only three or four “draught animals”) to secure positive local development, as well as less openness towards the surrounding world. Overall, meeting places were found to be crucial for specific and social trust to lubricate bridging social capital. And indeed there were many more “public” meeting places for all in Klitmøller, while “private” meeting places prevailed in Karby.
You do not have access to this content

Combating Poverty in Europe

Active Inclusion in a Multi-Level and Multi-Actor Context

Edited by Rune Halvorsen and Bjørn Hvinden

Discovering methods to combat poverty and social exclusion has now become a major political challenge in Europe. This book offers an original and timely analysis of how actors at the European, national and subnational levels meet this challenge. Combining perspectives on multilevel and network coordination, the editors discuss to what extent actors join forces in these efforts and identify the factors limiting the coordination achieved in practice. The book builds on a European study comparing Germany, Italy, Poland, Sweden and the UK.
You do not have access to this content

Gunnar L.H. Svendsen and Gert T. Svendsen