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Edited by Anthony J. Nyberg and Thomas P. Moliterno

Strategic human capital resources are a relatively new construct with a scholarly literature that is still evolving. Work in this area requires the integration of multiple theoretical perspectives and empirical approaches, but that integration rarely occurs. Within these pages, the editors have combined the voices of leading scholars from a wide range of disciplinary backgrounds to provide a comprehensive introduction to the current state of the field.
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Anthony J. Nyberg, Robert E. Ployhart and Thomas P. Moliterno

The chapters in this volume demonstrate that scholarly interest in human capital resources (HCR) is vibrant and growing. This volume unites 51 scholars steeped in sociology, economics, strategy, labor economics, human resources, organizational behavior, and psychology. The range of experience contributes to differing views about HCR: what they are, what they do, and how they are formed. When looking across chapters, one may wonder how we can reach an understanding of HCR when leading scholars have such different views. How can there be scientific advancement of HCR if there is such a broad diversity of expert opinion? We argue such a view is unnecessarily pessimistic and misses the point of this book, and the efforts of so many extraordinary researchers. We are encouraged to see researchers exploring the nuances of HCR from a variety of scholarly domains, theoretical perspectives, and academic disciplines. It is through the variability and diversity of these different perspectives that we can understand the multiple dimensions of the HCR construct. Moreover, this volume demonstrates commonalities in the types of questions scholars ask: how human capital (HC) becomes a human capital resource (HCR); how an HCR becomes strategic human capital resource (SHCR); the factors that shape the process of HCR formation; and how HCRs affect outcomes across organizational levels.

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Thomas P. Moliterno and Anthony J. Nyberg

This volume is about human capital resources (HCRs). Since the HCR construct is a newcomer to a long-standing literature on human capital (Becker, 1964), we begin with a brief historical thumbnail review of the history of research on HCR. We do so to provide a quick orientation to the focus of this volume: it is neither our intention nor hope to be exhaustive in this regard. Over the past 20 years, there has been an increasing convergence of scholarly disciplines exploring the association of human capital and organizational performance. Early gatherings at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania and the University of Utah brought together arrays of scholars from diverse backgrounds who were interested in exploring the organizational effects and antecedents of human capital. As scholarly discourse at the intersection of these fields grew, researchers from strategic human resource management (HRM) and strategy disciplines combined to create the Strategic Human Capital Interest Group that first met in Rome in 2010 and has been one of the faster-growing interest groups of the Strategic Management Society (SMS). At this point, the HCR construct had not yet been articulated and defined. Its genesis came from the realization that the human capital construct had begun to take on different meanings in different literatures. Many scholars thought of human capital as something specifically owned by workers (i.e., “the individual’s human capital”), while others were focused on how workers contributed to organizational performance (i.e., “the firm’s human capital”). That is, some researchers (predominantly from the “micro” traditions of organizational behavior, organizational psychology, and human resource management) focused on the “human” and some researchers (predominantly from the “macro” traditions of strategy and economics) focused on the “capital.” Hence the term “human capital” was simultaneously being used too broadly, including all firm-level phenomena involving workers, and too narrowly, missing how individual differences in knowledge, skills, abilities, and other characteristics (KSAOs) help define the value of the worker to the firm.

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Edited by John Armbrecht, Erik Lundberg and Tommy D. Andersson

This book explores and expands upon the core topics in the current academic debate within event management research. Emerging areas and innovative methodologies are organised into three themes: Events in Society, Event Consumers, and the Event Organization.
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Organizational Project Management

Theory and Implementation

Ralf Müller, Nathalie Drouin and Shankar Sankaran

This concise text introduces an integrated view of all project management-related activities in an organization, called Organizational Project Management (OPM). Practical cases from several organizations, as well as popular theories such as the Resource-Based Theory and Institutional Theory provide for an insightful yet realistic understanding of OPM as an integrative tool for organizations to improve their efficiency and effectiveness.
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Ralf Müller, Nathalie Drouin and Shankar Sankaran

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Edited by Mathieu Winand and Christos Anagnostopoulos

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Edited by Joseph Sarkis

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Edited by Joseph Sarkis

Supply chain management has long been a feature of industry and commerce but, with increasing demands from consumers, producers are spending more time and money investing in ways to make supply chains more sustainable. This exemplary Handbook provides readers with a comprehensive overview of current research on sustainable supply chain management.
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Edited by Mathieu Winand and Christos Anagnostopoulos

Sports governance has developed into a considerable field of research, and has piqued many researchers’ interest worldwide. What’s more, recent scandals that have affected the world of sport can be directly related to misgovernance. Research Handbook on Sport Governance aims to gather the state-of-the art research on sports governance. It offers a vital reference point for advancing research on the matter, while illustrating different approaches and perspectives, such as good governance principles, systemic governance, political governance and network governance.