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Bruce Porter, Jackie Dugard, Daniela Ikawa and Lilian Chenwi

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Edited by Jackie Dugard, Bruce Porter, Daniela Ikawa and Lilian Chenwi

This exciting Research Handbook combines practitioner and academic perspectives to provide a comprehensive, cutting edge analysis of economic, social and cultural rights (ESCR), as well as the connection between ESCR and other rights. Offering an authoritative analysis of standards and jurisprudence, it argues for an expansive and inclusive approach to ESCR as human rights.
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Combating Money Laundering in Africa

Dealing with the Problem of PEPs

John Hatchard

This insightful book critically explores the political, constitutional, legal, and economic challenges of effectively combating the laundering of the proceeds of crime by politically exposed persons (PEPs) in Africa.
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John Hatchard

This chapter reviews the present position in the fight against money laundering by African PEPs. Despite their political power and influence, the chapter concludes that thanks to constitutional, legal and economic factors there is cause for cautious optimism that AML action at the national, transnational and corporate levels is having a positive impact. This is illustrated by the Thiam, Cashgate and Airbus cases and the disclosures from the Luanda Papers. The chapter also notes the vital role played by civil society organisations in supporting AML efforts.

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John Hatchard

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John Hatchard

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John Hatchard

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Gregory H. Fox and Brad R. Roth

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Gregory H. Fox and Brad R. Roth

At the end of the Cold War, international law scholars engaged in furious debate over whether principles of democratic legitimacy had entered international law. Many argued that a “democratic entitlement” was then emerging. Others were skeptical that international practice in democracy promotion was either consistent or sufficiently widespread and many found the idea of a democratic entitlement dangerous. Those debates, while ongoing, have not been comprehensively revisited in almost twenty years. This research review identifies the leading scholarship of the past two decades on these and other questions. It focuses particular attention on the normative consequences of the recent “democratic recession” in many regions of the world.
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Gregory H. Fox and Brad R. Roth