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John E. King

For most economists, ‘Austrian economics’ refers to a distinct school of thought, originating with Mises and Hayek and characterised by a strong commitment to free-market liberalism. This innovative book explores an alternative Austrian tradition in economics. Demonstrating how the debate on the economics of socialism began in Austria long before the 1930s, it analyses the work and impact of many leading Austrian economists through a century of Austrian socialist economics.
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Institutions and Evolution of Capitalism

Essays in Honour of Geoffrey M. Hodgson

Edited by Francesca Gagliardi and David Gindis

In just over 30 years, Geoff Hodgson has made substantial contributions to institutional economics, evolutionary economics, economic methodology, the history of economic thought and social theory. To mark his seminal work, this volume brings together original contributions by world-leading scholars in specific areas that have played a significant role in influencing his thinking or represent key debates to which he has contributed. Building on some of the most significant philosophical and methodological foundations underlying Hodgson's work, the volume is organised around the recurring themes of institutions, evolution and capitalism.
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David J. Teece and Neil M. Kay

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David J. Teece and Neil M. Kay

This stimulating research review analyses how the theory of the firm evolved from several core concepts and building blocks that underpin this important area of economics. It discusses a variety of perspectives from leading scholars in the field, including the basic elements of: risk and uncertainty; information and knowledge; bounded rationality and decision making; motives and incentives; resources and capabilities; and transactions. The review goes on to examine how the various elements are integrated into the modern Theory of the Firm with the notion of organization coming increasingly to the fore. It focuses on norms; rules and routines; the entrepreneur; governance; hierarchies; co-operation, teams and networks; innovation and appropriability. This comprehensive review will be an invaluable reference tool for all researchers and students with an interest in the modern theory of the firm, highlighting how it needs to evolve further to address the important management and policy issues of our time.
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David J. Teece and Neil M. Kay

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David J. Teece and Neil M. Kay

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Edited by John K. Wilson and Richard Pomfret

The economics of sport has been a dynamic branch of economic research in recent years. This reflects the size and salience of the sports industry in many countries and increasingly as an international phenomenon. Professional sports leagues and individual mega-events can be multi-billion-dollar activities driven as much, and sometimes more, by economics as by the sporting aspect. The clear set of rules and ‘big data’ available from many sports has also provided fertile ground for testing and refining responses to incentives and core elements of game theory and behavioural economics.

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Edited by John K. Wilson and Richard Pomfret

The sports sector, apart from being of economic significance in itself, is clearly one that many citizens share a great interest in. It is not mere results, but aspects such as history, statistics, interest in labour markets and finances that often spark people’s interest. Historical Perspectives on Sports Economics explores a variety of topics including mega-event analysis, sports governance, anthropometrics, gambling, industrial organisation, infrastructure development and racial issues. 
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Edited by John K. Wilson and Richard Pomfret

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John K. Wilson

Many people believe that interest in history has waned. University offerings of history degrees have fallen, and there are constant calls to reform and reinvent the teaching of history in our schools. While this may be to some extent true, it is interesting to observe that the sense of history held by most sports fans is deep, and has certainly not changed in many decades. Teams are remembered for their memorable clashes and rivalries, achievements, and on occasion, even their demise over time. Players even long dead are remembered, discussed and compared against their contemporaries. There is a fondness for old stadiums, leagues and these are constantly used as a benchmark against which modern sports are measured.