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Edited by Guillaume Vallet

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Inequalities and the Progressive Era

Breakthroughs and Legacies

Edited by Guillaume Vallet

Inequalities and the Progressive Era features contributors from all corners of the world, each exploring a different type of inequality during the ‘Progressive Era’ (1890s-1930s). Though this era is most associated with the United States, it corresponds to a historical period in which profound changes and progress are realized or expected all over the globe.
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Edited by Guillaume Vallet

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Aggregate Demand and Employment

International Perspectives

Edited by Brian K. MacLean, Hassan Bougrine and Louis-Philippe Rochon

With an emphasis on developments during and after the Great Recession, and paying due attention to the impacts of austerity policies, the chapters assembled for this book explain that high growth of aggregate demand is as essential as ever for achieving full employment and rising living standards. Written by distinguished Keynesian and Post-Keynesian economists from diverse national backgrounds, the book tackles critical theoretical and empirical issues to illuminate the economic experiences both of large geographic regions such as Europe, Latin America, and Africa, as well as specific national economies including the USA, Japan, India, and Canada.
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Edited by Brian K. MacLean, Hassan Bougrine and Louis-Philippe Rochon

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Edited by Nikolaos Karagiannis and John E. King

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A Modern Guide to State Intervention

Economic Policies for Growth and Sustainability

Edited by Nikolaos Karagiannis and John E. King

A Modern Guide to State Intervention investigates the impact of the changing role of the state, offering an alternative political economy for the third decade of the twenty-first century. Building on important factors including history, the role of institutions, society and economic structures, this Modern Guide considers economic and administrative interventions towards changing the destabilized status quo of modern societies.
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Finance, Growth and Inequality

Post-Keynesian Perspectives

Edited by Louis-Philippe Rochon and Virginie Monvoisin

This book brings together some leading and emerging scholars who bring an alternative view on some of the most pressing issues of today. In addition to key concepts in post-Keynesian and heterodox economics, the authors also explore financialization, debt, income distribution, and policies, and the emerging threat of dualism. Policy makers and scholars alike will find the book a much need addition to the field.
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Edited by Jesper Jespersen and Finn Olesen

Today, more than a decade after the outbreak of the Great Recession, many economies are still struggling to get back on a prosperous track. Most countries were hit hard by the international crisis. The US, the EU and other countries have experienced low GDP growth rates and high levels of unemployment for a number of years. In the EU, and especially within the Eurozone, most member states have had to cope with the mainstream macroeconomic policy strategy of austerity (with Greece as the most significant recession case of the EU). As such, the neoclassical macroeconomics that became so dominant during the 1990s, and is still today by many seen as the only way to do macroeconomics, ruled the process of giving advice on economic policies to overcome the crisis. By using general equilibrium theory and models as the dominant analytical device, the focus point was at de-regulation, privatization and a balanced public sector budget to secure private sector optimization. No wonder that the vision of the beneficial welfare state and the egalitarian society was set on hold and in many cases rolled back on the political agenda. However, as we know as a fact today, prosperity did not come back to the many only to the few, already well off, in the US, in the EU and many other places. This misunderstood macroeconomics has taken a heavy political toll, because ‘[there is a] lack of correspondence between the results of their [the professional economists’] theory and the fact of observation; - a discrepancy which the ordinary man has not failed to observe’ (Keynes, 1936, p. 33). The Great Recession, initiated 10 years ago, began as an international financial crisis. It came as a surprise to mainstream macroeconomists. Accordingly, the policy recommendations were inconsistent and have been followed by stagnation, particularly of European economies, for a number of years. Consequently, many macroeconomic scholars have cast a critical eye on the content of the previously dominant new Macroeconomic Moderation (Bernanke, 2012) and the related Dynamic Stochastic General Equilibrium (DSGE) models.

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Louis-Philippe Rochon and Virginie Monvoisin

The financial crisis that began in 2007 has generally shown the weaknesses of neoclassical theories and policies, in particular by highlighting the irrelevance of modern macro models such as the Dynamic Stochastic General Equilibrium (DSGE) model and its microfoundations, which has come under considerable attack in the last few years, even from the mainstream. Indeed, as Lavoie (2018, p. 15) observes, “there is considerable dissatisfaction with the current state of mainstream macroeconomics”, leading The Economist (2009) to refer to the “turmoil among macroeconomists”. As early as 2009, Krugman (2009a, Internet) was claiming “[t]he economics profession mistook beauty, clad in impressive-looking mathematics, for truth”. More recently, he once again criticised the quest for microfoundations (see 2013, Internet), arguing “so the truth was that microfoundations in macroeconomics had its moment, but failed utterly at the one thing it was sold, above all, as being able to do - namely, give a better explanation of why nominal shocks have real effects. Time, you might think, to reconsider the project”. A few years earlier, Solow, in a 2010 address to the United States Congress, disapprovingly claimed “I do not think that the currently popular DSGE models pass the smell test” (see Solow, 2010).