Browse by title

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 756 items :

  • Climate Change x
  • Law - Academic x
Clear All
You do not have access to this content

Edited by Jordi Jaria-Manzano and Susana Borrás

Climate change is causing traditional political and legal concepts to be revisited. The emergence of a global polity through physical, economic and social interaction demands global responses which should be founded upon new principles and which cannot simply be modelled on traditional constitutionalism centred on the nation-state. This Research Handbook explores how to build this climate constitutionalism at a global level, starting from the narrative of Anthropocene and its implications for law. It provides a critical approach to global environmental constitutionalism, analysing the problems of sustainability and global equity which are entwined with the causes and consequences of climate change. The Handbook explores how to develop constitutional discourses and strategies to address these issues, and thereby tackle the negative effects of climate change whilst also advancing a more sustainable, equitable and responsible global society.
This content is available to you

Edited by Mona Hymel, Larry Kreiser, Janet E. Milne and Hope Ashiabor

This content is available to you

Edited by Mona Hymel, Larry Kreiser, Janet E. Milne and Hope Ashiabor

This content is available to you

Edited by Mona Hymel, Larry Kreiser, Janet E. Milne and Hope Ashiabor

You do not have access to this content

Edited by Mona Hymel, Larry Kreiser, Janet E. Milne and Hope Ashiabor

Although the world faces many environmental challenges, climate change continues to demand attention. This timely book explores ways in which market-based instruments and complementary policies can help countries meet their climate change goals. The chapters explore carbon pricing and other tax and non-tax measures, offering useful market-based perspectives that can help inform the many climate policy decisions that lie ahead.
This content is available to you

Edited by Mona Hymel, Larry Kreiser, Janet E. Milne and Hope Ashiabor

You do not have access to this content

Craig Anthony (Tony) Arnold

This chapter describes the structural roles that law plays to facilitate adaptation to climate disasters, as well as the features of adaptive legal systems. Climate disasters highlight the need for legal systems to help human communities and environmental systems to adapt to climate change and climate disasters. However, adaptation won’t be possible unless legal systems themselves are adaptive. The chapter discusses four changes that would make legal systems more adaptive: greater flexibility; use of law for transformation; a revolutionary evolution in the law; and an intentional focus on justice, including climate justice, disaster justice, and most especially resilience justice.

You do not have access to this content

Jonathan Verschuuren

Climate change impacts on agriculture are diverse and potentially disastrous for global food security. This chapter analyzes the main issues law and policymakers at the international and the domestic level should focus on when developing a legal framework that is sufficiently equipped to deal with climate disasters affecting agriculture. Three stages are distinguished: disaster mitigation, in which focus should be on adoption and implementation of climate-smart practices and technologies; disaster response, mainly aimed at food supply; compensation and rebuilding, aimed at creating a more resilient agricultural sector that is better suited to deal with the next climate disaster.

You do not have access to this content

Teresa Parejo-Navajas and Michael B. Gerrard

This chapter examines the most important existing regulatory and policy measures to improve the resiliency and adaptive capacity of all types of residential and commercial buildings, both new and existing. It considers how buildings should be modified to cope with climate-related extreme events. Building codes and other legal requirements often lag seriously behind the need to revise them, and most builders do not go beyond what the codes require. Climate projections involve a wide uncertainty range, and protection against the worst case scenarios may be beyond the economic capacity of all but a few owners. Particular attention is paid to slums, and to provisional and post-disaster housing.

You do not have access to this content

M. Scott Donald

The effects of climate change are already being felt in financial markets. The role of the pension fund trustee is to mediate between its members’ interests and the opportunities and risks emerging in those markets. This chapter provides a nuanced and contextualised account of the legal and regulatory framework in which Australian pension funds, in particular, navigate this complex, contested, and uncertain environment.