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Edited by Tim Hall and Vincenzo Scalia

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Edited by Tim Hall and Vincenzo Scalia

This multidisciplinary collection of essays by leading international scholars explores many pressing issues related to global crime. The book opens with essays that look across this diverse terrain and then moves on to consider specific areas including organised crime, cyber-crime, war-crimes, terrorism, state and private violence, riots and political protest, prisons, sport and crime and counterfeit goods. The book emphasises the centrality of crime to the contemporary global world and mobilises diverse disciplinary positions to help understand and address this.
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Edited by Barney Warf

The Handbook on the Geographies of Corruption offers a comprehensive overview of how corruption varies across the globe. It explores the immense range of corruption among countries, and how this reflects levels of wealth, the centralization of power, colonial legacies, and different national cultures. Barney Warf presents an original and interdisciplinary collection of chapters from established researchers and leading academics that examine corruption from a spatial perspective.
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Bryan Sanderson

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Carlos Cavallé

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The Home

Multidisciplinary Reflections

Edited by Antonio Argandoña

In the first major work to take the home as a center of analysis for global social problems, experts from a variety of fields reveal the multidimensional reality of the home and its role in societies worldwide. This unique book serves as a basis for action by proposing global legislative, political and institutional initiatives with the home in mind.
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Antonio Argandoña

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Andreas Raspotnik

Since 2008, the European Commission, the Council of the European Union and the European Parliament have started to develop a distinct EU policy for the Arctic region. Although the EU’s Arctic policy toolkit rests on a strong regional foothold, a single Arctic policy of the European Union has not yet been developed. Moreover, while the position of the EU’s three main institutions have been gradually converging, the policy is still emerging with the actors being incapable yet of proposing a clear-cut overarching European concept for the Arctic region. Up to now the European Union has not set out a clear statement of its northern regional ambitions – a distinct EU–Arctic narrative or single organising idea. It has also failed to become an observer to the Arctic Council.

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Andreas Raspotnik

Over the last decade, the Arctic region has reappeared on the international radar. Due to global warming and a literally melting Arctic Ocean, the region’s resources and maritime transportation opportunities have attracted the interests of stakeholders from within and outside the circumpolar North. It was assumed that increased international attention would change the geostrategic dynamics in the region and eventually lead to major power competition over regional resources, power and authority. Yet, during the period the Arctic states have strengthened the regional governance framework and effectively cooperated on a multilateral level. Also, an initially generated hype over the region’s economic opportunities could not stand up to scrutiny and a globalised reality check.

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Andreas Raspotnik

With the Arctic region being a sui generis neighbourhood for the European Union, the Arctic region raises an interesting question about the extent of the EU and how to gain regional credibility and legitimacy via which geopolitical discourse. Based on distinct geopolitical ideas, a particular regional discourse, the aim to wield organisational authority in the Arctic and the use of technological devices, the European Union has attempted to evolve as a legitimate actor in the Arctic region.