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Geraldine Van Bueren QC

The international and regional legal framework created to combat trafficking is clearly in place. There are also legal definitions. It has moved from shameful beginnings to the detailed support for those who have been trafficked. Because of the breadth of the regional and international instruments and their recent date, it would be difficult to argue that such legislation is the product of ‘Western’ thought, and therefore it ought to be easier to harness the political will of all states to enforce legislation aimed at protecting some of the globe’s most vulnerable people.

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Edited by Valsamis Mitsilegas, Saskia Hufnagel and Anton Moiseienko

This Research Handbook on Transnational Crime is an interdisciplinary, up-to-date guide to this growing field, written by an international cohort of leading scholars and experts. It covers all the major areas of transnational crime, providing a well-rounded, detailed discussion of each topic, and includes chapters focusing on responses to transnational crime in specific regions.
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Emiline Smith

This chapter attempts to provide a regional overview of transnational criminality in Asia, a continent marked by great diversity. It makes use of selected examples of illegal flows of goods and services, such as the trafficking of drugs, weapons, people, and cultural and natural resources, to explain the causes, consequences and challenges associated with transnational criminality in Asia. Recent large-scale trade liberalisation and infrastructure projects, such as China’s Belt and Road Initiative, promote connectivity and mobility across the region and even globally. However, such initiatives also risk facilitating transnational criminality, particularly when combined with the widespread economic underdevelopment, conflict and corruption that still trouble parts of Asia. Additionally, countering the many forms of transnational crime is made more difficult by differences in legislation and law enforcement capacity between countries. Combined, these factors have meant that transnational criminality is now firmly entrenched in every country in Asia.

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Anton Moiseienko

This chapter offers an overview of transnational crime emanating from ex-Soviet countries, also commonly known as the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS) region. It focuses on three types of non-violent, profit-driven crime – corruption, fraud and cybercrime – and outlines typical criminal modi operandi, especially their cross-border dimension. The chapter also sheds light on the dual role of developed states, particularly those in Western Europe and North America, as both victims and unwitting facilitators of such crime, and discusses the attempts of foreign law enforcement agencies to counteract criminal activities that originate in ex-Soviet countries.

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Edited by Carol S. Steiker and Jordan M. Steiker

Comparative Capital Punishment offers a set of in-depth, critical and comparative contributions addressing death practices around the world. Despite the dramatic decline of the death penalty in the last half of the twentieth century, capital punishment remains in force in a substantial number of countries around the globe. This research handbook explores both the forces behind the stunning recent rejection of the death penalty, as well as the changing shape of capital practices where it is retained. The expert contributors address the social, political, economic, and cultural influences on both retention and abolition of the death penalty and consider the distinctive possibilities and pathways to worldwide abolition.
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Edited by Carol S. Steiker and Jordan M. Steiker

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Edited by Susan M. Sterett and Lee D. Walker

The Research Handbook on Law and Courts provides a systematic analysis of new work on courts as governing institutions. Authors consider how courts have taken on regulating fundamental categories of inclusion and exclusion, including citizenship rights. Courts’ centrality to governance is addressed in sections on judicial processes, sub-national courts, and political accountability, all analyzed in multiple legal/political systems. Other chapters turn to analyzing the worldwide push for diversity in staffing courts. Finally, the digitization of records changes both court processes and studying courts. Authors included in the Handbook discuss theoretical, empirical and methodological approaches to studying courts as governing institutions. They also identify promising areas of future research.
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Edited by Felia Allum, Isabella Clough Marinaro and Rocco Sciarrone

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Italian Mafias Today

Territory, Business and Politics

Edited by Felia Allum, Isabella Clough Marinaro and Rocco Sciarrone

Despite a rapidly changing economic and legal landscape, Italian mafias remain prominent actors in the global criminal underworld. This book provides an extensive and up-to-date view of how they adapt to shifting economic opportunities and intensifying legal and civic backlash.
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Edited by Tim Hall and Vincenzo Scalia