Browse by title

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 630 items :

  • Criminal Law and Justice x
Clear All
This content is available to you

Edited by Margaret deGuzman and Valerie Oosterveld

You do not have access to this content

Edited by Margaret deGuzman and Valerie Oosterveld

This comprehensive Companion examines the achievements and challenges of the International Criminal Court (ICC), the world’s first permanent international criminal tribunal. It provides an overview of the first two decades of the ICC’s existence, investigating the dominant narratives and counter-narratives that have emerged about the institution and its work.
You do not have access to this content

Kerttuli Lingenfelter

The Lisbon Treaty consolidated, clarified and shifted the division of European Union competences in matters of criminal law. These are the developments that this chapter explores. Starting with the legal framework introduced by the Lisbon treaty, the chapter lays down both the conferred competences and the legal limits to them. The chapter then turns to the specifics of the Union’s procedural, institutional and substantive competences, elaborating upon the interplay between the competences in law and jurisprudence. To augment those parts of the legal texts that are not exhaustive, the chapter concludes by reflecting on the Court of Justice’s post-Lisbon jurisprudence on criminal competences, in which the Court has been attuning its doctrines to the challenges arising from the Lisbon legal framework for criminal justice.

You do not have access to this content

The Governance of Criminal Justice in the European Union

Transnationalism, Localism and Public Participation in an Evolving Constitutional Order

Edited by Ricardo Pereira, Annegret Engel and Samuli Miettinen

This timely book provides an astute assessment of the institutional and constitutional boundaries, interactions and tensions between the different levels of governance in EU criminal justice. Probing the conceptual and theoretical underpinnings of the EU’s approach to transnational crime, it proposes improved mechanisms for public participation in the governance of EU criminal law, designed to ensure better transparency, accountability and democratic controls.
This content is available to you

Edited by Ricardo Pereira, Annegret Engel and Samuli Miettinen

This content is available to you

Michael C. LaBelle

You do not have access to this content

Energy Cultures

Technology, Justice, and Geopolitics in Eastern Europe

Michael C. LaBelle

This thought-provoking book explores the concept of energy cultures as a means of understanding social and political relations and how energy injustices are created. Using Eastern Europe as an example, it examines the radical transition occurring as the region leaves behind the legacy of the Soviet Union, and the effects of the resulting power struggle between the energy cultures of Russia and the European Union.
This content is available to you

Michael C. LaBelle

This content is available to you

Michael C. LaBelle

You do not have access to this content

Mark Goodale

This afterword to the volume offers critical reflections on the book’s major contributions and situates them in relation to wider debates over the future of the International Criminal Court, the possibilities for international justice, and the question of whether or not human rights should remain an important part of international law. More specifically, the afterword examines the ways in which the volume privileges a distance-near perspective on the relationship between law and culture at the ICC, including, importantly, insiders’ accounts of how culture shapes the inner workings of the Court, its administrative and prosecutorial activities, and its responses to wider critiques of its investigations. The afterword concludes by considering the volume’s central claim that it is through a study of the intersections of law and culture that we can best understand the dilemmas faced by the Court and its prospects for the future.