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Hossein Fazilatfar

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Hossein Fazilatfar

As one scholar states: “Few legal issues ignite such major debates amongst lawyers as the issue of mandatory rules of law.” Mandatory rules are the imperative provisions of law, which must be applied to a transaction involving a foreign element, irrespective of the law that governs that transaction. In other words, mandatory rules are laws that may not be derogated from or excluded by contracting parties. Article 9 of the Rome I Regulation refers to mandatory rules as overriding mandatory provisions: “provisions the respect for which is regarded as crucial by a country for safeguarding its public interests, such as its political, social or economic organization, to such an extent that they are applicable to any situation falling within their scope, irrespective of the law otherwise applicable to the contract ….”

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Hossein Fazilatfar

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Hossein Fazilatfar

Overriding Mandatory Rules in International Commercial Arbitration discusses the applicability of mandatory rules of law in international commercial arbitration and addresses the concerns of the arbitrators and judges at various stages of arbitration and the enforcement of the award.
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Hossein Fazilatfar

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Renmin Chinese Law Review

Selected Papers of the Jurist (法学家) Volume 7

Edited by Jichun Shi

Renmin Chinese Law Review, Volume 7 is the fourth work in a series of annual volumes on contemporary Chinese law which bring together the work of recognized scholars from China, offering a window on current legal research in China.
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Simon Marsden

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Simon Marsden

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Protecting the Third Pole

Transplanting International Law

Simon Marsden

This highly topical book considers the important question of how best to protect the environment of the Third Pole – the area comprising the Hindu Kush Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau – using the tool of international law. Following detailed analysis of the weaknesses in the current legal protections according to comparative legal theory, Simon Marsden recommends three potential options for implementation by policy and lawmakers.
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Simon Marsden