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Social Trust and Economic Development

The Case of South Korea

O. Yul Kwon

In just one generation, South Korea has transformed from a recipient of foreign aid to a member of the G20. In this informative book, South Korea is used as a case by which to explore and illustrate specific issues arising from the complex relationships between the nation’s economic development and society.
Open access

Yasuyuki Sawada

Open access

Edited by Elisabetta Gentile

Open access

Edited by Elisabetta Gentile

Open access

Skilled Labor Mobility and Migration

Challenges and Opportunities for the ASEAN Economic Community

Edited by Elisabetta Gentile

One of the primary objectives of the ASEAN Economic Community (AEC), established in 2015, was to boost skilled labor mobility within the region. This insightful book takes stock of the existing trends and patterns of skilled labor migration in the ASEAN. It endeavors to identify the likely winners and losers from the free movement of natural persons within the region through counterfactual policy simulations. Finally, it discusses existing issues and obstacles through case studies, as well as other sectoral examples.
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Kenneth Boutin

China and the United States have reached a crossroads where their economic relationship is concerned, as the shared interest in economic prosperity and complementary economic strengths that provide the common ground of industrial collaboration are threatened by increasing attention to economic facets of national security. This trend is encouraging policies which potentially undermine the basis of Sino-American industrial integration. This book explores the basis, nature and impact of evolving economic security agendas in the United States and China.
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Kenneth Boutin

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Religion and Finance

Comparing the Approaches of Judaism, Christianity and Islam

Mervyn K. Lewis and Ahmad Kaleem

Judaism, Christianity and Islam all impose obligations and constraints upon the rightful use of wealth and earthly resources. All three of these religions have well-researched views on the acceptability of practices such as usury but the principles and practices of other, non-interest, financial instruments are less well known. This book examines each of these three major world faiths, considering their teachings, social precepts and economic frameworks, which are set out as a guide for the financial dealings and economic behaviour of their adherents.
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Takatoshi Ito, Satoshi Koibuchi, Kiyotaka Sato and Junko Shimizu

Chapter 4 examines a data set based on the questionnaire surveys in 2009 and 2013. Questionnaires were sent to head offices of all Japanese manufacturing firms listed on Japan’s stock exchanges and that reported foreign sales in their consolidated financial statements. Major findings are as follows: while yen invoicing is often chosen for arm’s-length trade, the importer’s currency tends to be used in invoicing in intra-firm trade. In exports to Asian subsidiaries, US dollars are widely used. Firm size does affect the choice of invoice currency because the larger (smaller) the size of a firm, the less (more) likely the yen is to be chosen. Growing and deepening regional production networks in Asia are likely to discourage yen-invoiced transactions, even by Japanese firms. Japanese production subsidiaries that export finished goods to the world tend to choose US dollar-invoiced transactions even for their imports of semi-finished goods from their head offices.

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Takatoshi Ito, Satoshi Koibuchi, Kiyotaka Sato and Junko Shimizu

Chapter 2 surveys recent developments in theoretical and empirical studies on the question of invoice currency choice. By examining aggregate data on invoice currency, published by the authorities, it is shown that the Japanese invoicing currency pattern violates well-known stylized facts: (1) trade between advanced countries tends to be invoiced in the exporter’s currency; (2) trade between advanced and developing countries tends to be invoiced in the advanced country’s currency; and (3) differentiated products tend to be invoiced in the exporter’s currency. More homogeneous products are typically invoiced in an international currency such as the US dollar. Chapter 2 presents two puzzles. First, Japanese exports to advanced countries tend to be invoiced in the importer’s currency; and second, the share of US dollar invoicing is higher than that of yen invoicing in trade with Asia. In order to solve these puzzles, subsequent chapters examine firm-level data obtained through interviews and questionnaire surveys.