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Regions and Innovation Policies in Europe

Learning from the Margins

Edited by Manuel González-López and Bjørn T. Asheim

Offering a novel contribution within the growing field of regional innovation policies, this book combines recent theoretical developments and empirical contributions, with a particular focus on non-core regions. Leading academics in the field discuss the topics of regional path transformation, place-based strategies and policy learning. Also included are sections on the role of EU institutions on the promotion of regional innovation and the analysis and comparison of the innovation policies experiences of four non-core European regions.
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Edited by Attila Varga and Katalin Erdős

The Handbook on Universities and Regional Development offers a comprehensive and up-to-date insight into how academic institutions spur their surroundings. The volume sheds light on universities as regional development actors from a historical perspective by introducing institutional changes and discussing the interrelatedness of society, business and academia. It provides detailed investigations on various knowledge transfer mechanisms to help understand the diverse ways through which ideas and intellectual property can flow between universities and businesses. Detailed case studies from three continents (Europe, Asia, and America) demonstrate the highly contextual nature of the interactions between academia, industry and government.
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Katalin Erdős and Attila Varga

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Harvey Goldstein, Verena Radinger-Peer and Sabine Sedlacek

Research universities fill a variety of roles within contemporary society (Goldstein et al., 1995). Arguably the most important role has been providing advanced education to a segment of the population so that they have the requisite know-how to enter the professions. A second has been to generate knowledge through research that leads to scientific progress over time and indirectly often leads to productivity growth in the economy. These have been the traditional missions of research universities since their founding in the late nineteenth century.

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Yuzhuo Cai, Po Yang and Anu Lyytinen

The literature on the role of universities in regional innovation systems mainly deals with research universities, for example, with an emphasis on knowledge transfer (Anatan, 2015). This is also the case in the Chinese context (Cai, 2018). In recent years, the importance of non-research universities in regional development and innovation has been increasingly recognized (Taylor et al., 2008). Among a small volume of studies exploring the role of universities of applied science (UASs), or non research universities, in the process of regional innovation, a constant challenge has been that of applying appropriate theoretical or analytical frameworks. Currently, most studies in this field apply theoretical insights originally developed for under standing the relationship between research universities and regional innovation systems. The most commonly used frameworks are, for instance, the Triple Helix model (Etzkowitz, 2008; Etzkowitz and Leydesdorff, 1995, 1997) for analysing the UASs and industry links (Yang et al., 2016), and the ‘five pathways to an entrepreneurial university’ (Clark, 1998) for understanding the organizational responses of UASs to the emerging demands of regional development (Lyytinen, 2011).

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Maria Estela Ferreira

This chapter aims to illustrate the main outcomes and the characteristics and factors of the resilience of the footwear industry in the northern region of Portugal as performed in the last 30 years. This industry acts in a cluster located in a number of towns around Porto, within a maximum distance of 50 km from this city. Such cluster is responsible for more than 90 per cent of Portuguese footwear exports. Along the analyzed period, and among other difficulties, two main shocks are identified which the industry had to face: the full membership of China in the WTO, in 2001, which carried the delocalization of most foreign footwear companies, mainly to the Far East, and the sub-prime world crisis in 2008. The industry survived and surpassed these shocks thanks to a thorough preparedness sustained by the action of entrepreneurs, together with a strong and active association and a technological center, which provided management and technical support and strengthened links between them, stimulating coordinated actions. This chapter suggests, through a non-linear approach, that Portuguese footwear exports are about to reach the level they would have attained if China hadn’t joined the WTO.

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Tüzin Baycan and Berna Sezen Özen

This chapter focuses on to what extend the innovation performance of EU countries has been affected by the global economic crisis and aims to investigate the relationship between the crisis and innovation performance while addressing the changes in the indicators of the Innovation Union Scoreboard Index after 2008. Focusing on these changes over the last ten years, the chapter compares and evaluates the innovation performance of EU countries and highlights which countries were more resilient in dealing with the recession.

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Yannis Psycharis, Dimitris Kallioras and Panagiotis Pantazis

This chapter sets out to provide empirical evidence regarding the impact of economic crisis on the employment changes in the NUTS III Greek regions, during the period 2008_2012. With the application of trade-adjusted shift-share analysis, the chapter provides additional explanatory evidence on whether openness and trade have affected the resilience of regions. Results indicate that economic crisis has impacted asymmetrically on regional employment losses, leading to a widening of regional employment disparities. Construction and manufacturing have been hit severely by the crisis. Agriculture constitutes a resilient sector, while knowledge- and technology-intensive sectors are also more resilient to crisis. The less well-off regions dependent on more traditional sectors proved to be more resilient. However, trade relations and openness are offering as stabilizers to economic downturn.

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A. Suut Doğruel, Fatma Doğruel and Yasemin Özerkek

Permanent duality across regions characterizes the regional disparities in Turkey. This duality exists in all dimensions of development, including the persistent unemployment problem. Throughout the last decade high unemployment rates were observed in all regions of the country. Focusing on unemployment in Turkey, the aim of the chapter is twofold. First, the chapter intends to capture the main determinants of the regional unemployment. To this end we define an excess supply function to estimate the determinants of regional unemployment combining the supply of and demand for labor. Second, the chapter scrutinizes the effects of external shocks on the regional variations in economic performance in Turkey. Regional unemployment and regional growth are defined as the basic economic performance indicators. For the first aim, migration is taken as the main source of the variations in the regional labor supply. On the demand side, we focus on the structural changes. The study defines two types of changes in the structure at the regional level: (1) The changes in the sectoral composition á la Kuznets; and (2) The Lilien index, which represents the dispersion in (or reallocation within) the sectors. For the second aim, we define two exogenous shocks: the 2008 crisis and the migration issue at the regional level. The 2008 crisis has a global character without any local dimension. Hence, its effects could be defined as completely exogenous. Migration can be affected partly by the regional factors. Therefore, we may assume that this shock is partially exogenous. In this part, the chapter will define the regions as flexible or rigid against these shocks. The results reveal that the adjustment potential to external shocks may be higher in the regions which have relatively simple economic structure.

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Edited by Urban Gråsjö, Charlie Karlsson and Iréne Bernhard

Developed countries must be incredibly innovative to secure incomes and welfare so that they may successfully compete against international rivals. This book focuses on two specific but interrelated aspects of innovation by incumbent firms and entrepreneurs, the role of geography and of open innovation.