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The Legitimacy of Standardisation as a Regulatory Technique

A Cross-disciplinary and Multi-level Analysis

Edited by Mariolina Eliantonio and Caroline Cauffman

This timely book examines the field of European and global standardisation, showing how standards give rise to a multitude of different legal questions. It explores diverse topics in regulation such as food safety, accounting, telecommunications and medical devices. Each chapter offers in-depth analysis of a number of key policy areas. These multi-disciplinary contributions go beyond the field of law, and provide cross-disciplinary comparisons.
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Edited by Jill Vickers, Joan Grace and Cheryl N. Collier

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Edited by Jill Vickers, Joan Grace and Cheryl N. Collier

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Edited by Jill Vickers, Joan Grace and Cheryl N. Collier

This insightful Handbook offers a comprehensive exploration of the third generation of gender and federalism studies. In this timely and authoritative examination, feminist scholars in both the West and the global south debate the impact of state architectures on women’s movements, partisan organizations and policy advocacy using innovative discursive, institutional and intersectional approaches.
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Jill Vickers, Joan Grace and Cheryl N. Collier

In this Handbook a number of international gender scholars explore the third ‘wave’ of research about gender, diversity and federalism. It focuses on how institutions, ideas and practices affect, and are affected by, gender regimes as well as territorially and non-territorially organized diversities, including minority ethnicities, ‘race’, religious and sexual minorities. In recent decades, scholarship examining the intersections between gender, diversity and state architectures in federations progressed through several earlier ‘waves’. In the first wave, starting in the 1980s, feminist political scientists and legal scholars began exploring if federal systems were good or bad for women in reference to their ability to make claims against the state, usually coming to the unsatisfying conclusion that ‘it depends’. Most of these early inquiries referred to older federations, such as Australia and Canada. A second wave of gender/federalism research started around 2000. Building on earlier inquiries, feminist scholars of federalism explored if and how federal systems were gendered and what this means for women’s advocacy, organization and citizenship. But they often failed to recognize the changing natures of federations and how actors such as women’s movements can reshape architectural arrangements and institutional opportunities.

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Edited by Jill Vickers, Joan Grace and Cheryl N. Collier

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Planners in Politics

Do they Make a Difference?

Edited by Louis Albrechts

In this innovative book, ten executive politicians with backgrounds in planning from around the world dissect their own political careers. Reflecting on the often structural impact of their work in political decision-making, they also consider the translation of their experiences back into academic life or professional practice.
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Edited by Maria A. Carrai, Jean-Christophe Defraigne and Jan Wouters

This timely book examines the Belt and Road Initiative (BRI), assessing its effect on the international economic order and global governance more broadly. Through a variety of qualitative case studies, the book investigates the implementation of the BRI and evaluates its development outcomes both for China and the countries it interacts with under the initiative, along with its international implications.
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Edited by Marta Cantero Gamito and Hans -W. Micklitz

This book explores questions of transnational private legal theory in the context of the external dimension of EU private law. The interaction between existing theories of transnational ordering and the external reach of European Regulatory Private Law is articulated through examination of what are found to be the three major proxies of transnational private ordering: private contracts, standards and codes.
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Sara Valaguzza and Eduardo Parisi