Chapter 2 A state-of-the-art review and future directions in gender and migration research
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This chapter aims to resolve definitional ambiguities on the research of gender and migration and to provide and integrated, synthesized overview of the current state of knowledge. It first reviews the concept of care as it has been a main axis of research in migration and gender studies. Secondly, it covers a wide state of the art production, first regarding women and migration, and second, the migration-care nexus. On one side the question arises around the debate on the feminisation of migration, and on the other side, it focuses on the key role of care in global migrations. Then it offers a critical illustration of a striking example of such circulation of care within and across borders: transnational mothering, grandmothering and daugthering. The chapter ends up by reflecting on future lines of research as a way of taking new research responsibilities in an uncertain and hyper globalised world.

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