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Edited by Lars Magnusson and Jan Ottosson

The notion and interpretation of path dependence have been discussed and utilized in various social sciences during the last two decades. This innovative book provides significant new insights onto how the different applications of path dependence have developed and evolved. The authors suggest that there has been a definite evolution from applications of path dependence in the history of technology towards other fields of social science. They also discuss the various definitions of path dependence (strong or weak) and explore the potential applications of path dependence in new areas such as political economy and economic geography.
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Wilfred Dolfsma

The formation of preferences is an elusive subject that many social scientists, and especially economists, have tended to avoid. In this original new book, Wilfred Dolfsma combines institutional economics with insights from the other social sciences to analyse the way in which preferences are formed in a social context.
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Edited by Erik S. Reinert

The expert contributors gathered here approach underdevelopment and inequality from different evolutionary perspectives. It is argued that the Schumpeterian processes of ‘creative destruction’ may take the form of wealth creation in one part of the globe and wealth destruction in another. Case studies explore and analyse the successful 19th century policies that allowed Germany and the United States to catch up with the UK and these are contrasted with two other case studies exploring the deindustrialization and falling real wages in Peru and Mongolia during the 1990s. The case studies and thematic papers together explore, identify and explain the mechanisms which cause economic inequality. Some papers point to why the present form of globalization increases poverty in many Third World nations.
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David Emanuel Andersson

Property Rights, Consumption and the Market Process extends property rights theory in new and exciting directions by combining complementary insights from Austrian, institutional and evolutionary economics. Mainstream economics tends to analyse property rights within a static equilibrium framework. In this book David Andersson reformulates property rights theory as an evolutionary theory of the market process.
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Deep Complexity and the Social Sciences

Experience, Modelling and Operationality

Robert Delorme

In this innovative work, Robert Delorme comprehensively explores uncertainty (the irreducibility to numerically measurable probabilities) and ignorance in economics, management and the social sciences through an alternative, systematically built analytical framework. This unique book takes uncertainty and ignorance seriously and addresses them as instances of ‘deep complexity’ (problem situations so deeply ill-structured that they cannot be grasped with the concepts and tools of classical science). Building on the works of Herbert Simon, Heinz von Foerster and John von Neumann, the author develops an alternative framework that encompasses, rather than rejects, the classical framework. The outcome of this novel approach is ‘effective deep complexity’, comprising three aspects: an effective alternative framework, which brings an answer to a fundamental issue on the implications of uncertainty for scientific reasoning; a behavioural theory of deeply ill-structured problem-situations; and a decision-and-action support system.
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Entrepreneurship, Money and Coordination

Hayek’s Theory of Cultural Evolution

Edited by Jürgen G. Backhaus

Hayek’s theory of cultural evolution has always generated controversy. Interest in Hayek’s theory, and others’ analysis and criticism of it, has been rising of late. This volume urges a reconsideration of Hayeks’ theory of evolution and aims to explore the relevance of Hayek’s theory for its own sake and for evolutionary economics more generally.
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Evolutionary Economic Thought

European Contributions and Concepts

Edited by Jürgen G. Backhaus

Evolutionary Economic Thought explores the theoretical roots of the evolutionary approach, and in so doing, demonstrates how it fits squarely into the theoretical mainstream. Focusing on the institutions of evolutionary change and the processes – such as competition – that generate change, this book takes account of important European contributions to the discipline, hitherto overshadowed by the American paradigm. As such, the book serves to broaden the current discourse. Whilst evolutionary economics itself is a well-researched and widely documented field, this book will be credited with establishing a history of evolutionary economic thought.