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Bala Mulloth and Michael D. Williams

Can university health systems tap into benefits of health technologies in a responsible manner to better manage patients and improve their outcomes using patient-empowered tools? With the adoption of Epic as their only electronic health record system beginning in 2011, the University of Virginia (UVA) medical centre’s Epic integration process has undergone multiple evaluations with the purpose of optimizing their healthcare delivery system. This chapter focuses on how a patient engagement capability of Epic known as MyChart helped UVA support patient care and research. The methodology employed is qualitative in nature and draws on evidence based on interpretative interviews as well as direct and indirect observations. Utilizing the four core principles viz. anticipation, reflexivity, inclusivity and responsiveness of the RRI framework, we offer our analysis and lessons learned. We also present the challenges to realize the full potential of such an EHR platform along with our concluding thoughts.

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Bharat Rao, Adam J. Harrison and Bala Mulloth

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Bharat Rao, Adam J. Harrison and Bala Mulloth

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Bharat Rao, Adam J. Harrison and Bala Mulloth

With the rapid advancement of 4IR (Fourth Industrial Revolution) technologies like robotics, artificial intelligence, big data analytics, and advanced manufacturing technologies, the US defense establishment is facing challenges to its traditional innovation paradigm on several fronts. Unlike in the past, the private sector and the venture economy are dictating the shape and pace of technological change, which means that the US Department of Defense needs to find ways to rapidly absorb these external changes, and convert them into internal solutions that help its war-fighting and peacetime missions. In addition, near-peer adversaries are investing heavily in such technologies and rapidly gaining ground at the leading edge. The purpose of this book is to take a closer look at the issue of innovation as it is conceptualized, institutionalized and practised in The US Department of Defense and the wider ecosystem around it, at this interesting cusp of change. We examine the attitudes, perceptions and behaviors towards innovation in the DoD; interactions of the DoD with internal and external stakeholders as it seeks to embrace innovation; and its approach to defining and building innovation competencies associated with human capital development, organization, and business practices. We examine how the DoD has evolved in its use of internal and external R & D and commercialization, and also developed initiatives to create, scale and deploy innovative solutions to assist in its missions. During our multi-year study, we interviewed key decision makers within and outside the DoD as well as several leading thinkers and policy analysts who deal with the issue of innovation in national security and related spheres on a daily basis. We studied organizations like DARPA, DIUx, US Army Reserves 75th Innovation Command, and Hacking for Defense, among others.

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Bharat Rao, Adam J. Harrison and Bala Mulloth

We describe the scale and scope of the national defense ecosystem, and outline the key objectives of the book, including our approach to understanding how innovation is conceptualized, institutionalized and practiced within the US Department of Defense. We then describe the organization of the book and our proposed contributions.

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Bharat Rao, Adam J. Harrison and Bala Mulloth

We provide a historical overview of innovation, with particular reference to how it is conceptualized and practiced within the US Department of Defense. We introduce the idea of innovation ecosystems, and describe their critical components and characteristics.

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Bharat Rao, Adam J. Harrison and Bala Mulloth

We consider the leading edge technology paradigms of the Fourth Industrial Revolution and examine how they have shaped thinking and action at the US Department of Defense. These include robotics, AI and autonomous deep learning systems, miniaturization (with a particular emphasis on nanotechnology), big data analytics, advanced manufacturing technologies, manned–unmanned teaming, and network-enabled semi-autonomous and autonomous weapons systems.

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Bharat Rao, Adam J. Harrison and Bala Mulloth

We describe the defense innovation cycle, and how the concepts of transilience and absorptive capacity can play key roles in dictating future competitive advantage in the national security context. We then develop a competency-based framework that can be adapted for fostering innovation in the DOD. These competencies include opportunity development, championing, resource leveraging and location leveraging.

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Bharat Rao, Adam J. Harrison and Bala Mulloth

Based on our interviews with key stakeholders as well as focused case studies, we describe how the competencies and combinations thereof have been successfully deployed within specific parts of the defense ecosystem. We then illustrate the competencies with case subjects: Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), Defense Innovation Unit (DIU), and the AAL (Army Applications Laboratory).

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Bharat Rao, Adam J. Harrison and Bala Mulloth

We describe the implications of our findings for innovation practice at the US Department of Defense. We summarize the key contributions of our research, and provide potential directions for future investigations. We offer a set of recommendations aimed at creating new innovation pathways, ramping up training and educational efforts, leveraging distributed networks and public–private partnerships for innovation, and the new implications of convergence.