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Gideon D. Markman

Backdoor entrepreneurship occurs when a university scientist sells, licenses or establishes a spinoff company based on their invention without informing or involving their employer institution. Drawing from recent research, Markman finds that backdoor entrepreneurship is not only relatively common, it also results in suboptimal innovation markets. To address these challenges, the author suggests that universities rethink some of their technology transfer protocols and commercialization policies and programs; experimentation may, in the end, bring even greater benefits to universities than the current model.
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Phillip H. Phan and Gideon D. Markman

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Edited by Gideon D. Markman and Phillip H. Phan

Research on general market entry usually focuses on large enterprises. Often, however, small entrants can alter the competitive dynamics of an industry. This volume brings together the most prominent thought leaders and the best research on the asymmetric entrant-incumbent dynamics. The ideas presented offer a more nuanced perspective on how, when, where and with what consequences small, single-product firms enter markets that are dominated by large, multiproduct and multimarket incumbents.
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Gideon D. Markman, Peter T. Gianiodis and Ann K. Buchholtz

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Maritza I. Espina, Phillip H. Phan and Gideon D. Markman

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Edited by Maritza I. Espina, Phillip H. Phan and Gideon D. Markman

The rapid and formative rise in research on social innovation and entrepreneurship means that theoretical frameworks are still being created, while traditional notions of economic efficiency and social welfare are tested. The field is progressing fastest in the measurement and measuring of social entrepreneurial effectiveness. Social innovators, who draw from philanthropy, as well as capital markets, for financial resources, have adopted the lean start up as a paradigm for their organization logics.