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Inga Haase

Doing a thesis with an ethnographic approach for a single case study in small business research is both an adventure and a walk on a tightrope. To get significant results a researcher has to gather extensive knowledge and develop a rich set of data about the case. Nevertheless, to gain access to the needed kind of data and information a certain level of involvement and trust between the researcher and members of the enterprise is inevitable. Thus, researchers have to go out and become a part of the field itself. However, this might lead to potential bias. Therefore, researchers have to rigorously reflect their actions and their role in the research process; documenting their experience and developing strategies to distance themselves from the case. Chapter 7 outlines the research process, using the example of a longitudinal in-depth single case study to provide insights into and recommendations for research practice.

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Inga Haase and Anna Müller

For early career researchers, it is a difficult task to do relevant research, but getting noticed and transferring one’s results to interested practitioners and the community is hard work too. One way to address these challenges is the use of digital and social media. Chapter 15 discusses results regarding the social network activities of early career researchers, focusing on the following question: What potential do social network activities have for influencing the visibility of early career researchers as well as the visibility and distribution of their results? The findings are based on an analysis of current literature as well as on statements and interviews with members of the scientific community. The results indicate that for early and mid-career researchers, the use of social network applications can increase visibility, or rather accessibility, and enable them to enter the scientific community at an earlier career stage than in previous years.