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Naomi Birdthistle and Thomas N. Garavan

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Antoinette Flynn, Naomi Birdthistle and Boyu Fang

The chapter examines how well the theory of planned behaviour (TPB) explains the entrepreneurial intentions of immigrant Chinese students in Ireland. The study gathered data by distributing a TPB-based questionnaire to Chinese students in Ireland and 122 responses were received. The study contributes to the existing knowledge in the fields of immigrant entrepreneurship and student entrepreneurial intentions by exploring immigrant entrepreneurship from the perspective of Chinese students who study at Irish third level institutions. Scholars have rarely explored this area so far. This study impacts the Chinese government’s comprehension of their overseas students’ present entrepreneurial intentions regarding establishing businesses in host countries and deepens the understanding of the Chinese entrepreneurial spirit. On the Irish side, this study assists the relevant government departments in developing more favourable policies for those potential international entrepreneurs by encouraging them to contribute more to Ireland’s SME economy.

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Robyn Eversole, Naomi Birdthistle, Megerssa Walo and Vinita Godinho

Women entrepreneurs are one of the fastest growing entrepreneurial populations, contributing to the world economy through a significant share of employment generation and economic growth. Yet Australian women have significantly lower entrepreneurial participation rates and growth ambitions than men. This chapter uses the lens of the entrepreneurial ecosystem to understand and map the supports available for enterprising women in two Australian regions: rural North West Tasmania and urban Melbourne. The authors find gaps in the current ecosystems supporting women entrepreneurs, regarding the extent to which supports are available, accessible, and/or appropriate for women. In each context, these gaps compromise the ability of women entrepreneurs to realize their full potential to develop high-growth businesses. These findings contribute to the emerging literature on women’s entrepreneurship by providing a grounded understanding of the components of support ecosystems and how they vary across local contexts. The chapter recommends adopting a place-based, gender-sensitive approach to business supports to address gaps such as access to finance for women entrepreneurs.

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Briga Hynes, Michele O’Dwyer and Naomi Birdthistle

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Thomas Garavan, Naomi Birdthistle, Barra Ó Cinnéide and Chris Collet