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Trevor Jones, Monder Ram and Paul Edwards

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Catherine Cazals, Paul Dudley, Jean-Pierre Florens and Michael Jones

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Andrew M. Jones, Nigel Rice and Paul Contoyannis

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Paul Jones, David Pickernell, Rebecca Connolly and Celia Netana

The study considers the provision and design of entrepreneurship education based on evidence from a quantitative survey regarding its value and impact. There has been a significant expansion of entrepreneurship education curriculum provision both within the UK and globally in the university sector. However, there remains ongoing debate regarding its value and contribution in terms of achieving viable business start-ups that contributes significantly in terms of employability and economic contribution. In the UK, the existing evidence base is typically short term in focus considering immediate attitudinal impact upon students of an entrepreneurship education intervention. This chapter considers evidence from a quantitative study of two UK Universities, namely Coventry University and the University of South Wales. Reflections on the effectiveness and impact of the entrepreneurship education experience were evaluated. The evidence collected in this study is UK centric, but will have relevance on a global perspective for the entrepreneurship education discipline and community. The evidence collected informs the value and design of entrepreneurship education and its impact on both self-employability and employability career choices. Moreover, the study informs entrepreneurship education by making recommendations regarding effective pedagogical practice and curriculum design. This study informs programme providers, enterprise support agencies and government policy makers regarding the value and construction of entrepreneurship education.

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Edited by David Martin Jones, Ann Lane and Paul Schulte

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Edited by David Martin Jones, Ann Lane and Paul Schulte

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Edited by David Martin Jones, Ann Lane and Paul Schulte

This innovative work examines the concept of the informal network and its practical utility within the context of counterterrorism. Drawing together a range of practitioner and academic expertise it explores the character and evolution of informal networks, addressing the complex relationship between kinship groups, transnational linkages and the role that globalization and new technologies play in their formation and sustainability.
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Andrew M. Jones, Nigel Rice and Paul Contoyannis

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Edited by David Martin Jones, Paul Schulte, Carl Ungerer and M. L.R. Smith

Almost two decades after the events of 9/11, this Handbook offers a comprehensive insight into the evolution and development of terrorism and insurgency since then. Gathering contributions from a broad range of perspectives, it both identifies new technological developments in terrorism and insurgency, and addresses the distinct state responses to the threat of political, or religiously motivated violence; not only in the Middle East and Europe, but also in Africa, South and Southeast Asia, and North and South America.
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Mark N.K. Saunders, Paul Tosey, Claire Jones and Christine S. Williams

In this chapter we consider the use and practical value of STEP, the Service Template Extended Process, to support applied HRD research in collaboration with practitioners. Used through a process consultation framework, STEP can surface values and underlying assumptions, thereby enabling both single and double-loop learning.