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J. Richard Harrison and Gordon Walker

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Richard Sharpley and David Harrison

Tourism has long been recognized as a potentially effective catalyst of development, not least because of its remarkable significance as a global economic sector. It is not surprising, therefore, that academic attention has long been paid to the relationship between tourism and development, specifically to the policies and processes that may optimize tourism’s developmental potential. However, both tourism and the global developmental context in which it occurs are dynamic; new opportunities emerge, as do new challenges. There is, therefore, a need for an agenda for research in tourism and development. This chapter introduces such an agenda. Following a critical review of the alleged benefits of tourism as an agent of development, it explores contemporary perspectives on development and conceptual approaches to understanding the tourism-development relationship (and knowledge gaps) before going on to introduce the chapters that comprise this book.

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Edited by Richard Sharpley and David Harrison

Tourism is integral to local, regional and national development policies; as a major global economic sector, it has the potential to underpin economic growth and wider development. Yet, transformations in both the nature of tourism and the dynamic environment within which it occurs give rise to new questions with regards to its developmental role. This Research Agenda offers a state-of-the-art review of the research into the tourism-development nexus. Exploring issues including governance, policy, philanthropy, poverty reduction and tourism consumption, it identifies significant gaps in the literature, and proposes new and sometimes provocative avenues for future research.
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Edited by Richard T. Harrison and Claire Leitch

This Research Handbook argues that the study of entrepreneurs as leaders is a gap in both the leadership and the entrepreneurship literatures. With conceptual and empirical chapters from a wide range of cultures and entrepreneurship and leadership ecosystems, the Research Handbook for the first time produces a systematic overview of the entrepreneurial leadership field, providing a state of the art perspective and highlighting unanswered questions and opportunities for further research. It consolidates existing theory development, stimulates new conceptual thinking and includes path-breaking empirical explorations.
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Richard T. Harrison and Claire M. Leitch

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Mark Dibben, Richard Harrison and Colin Mason

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Claire M. Leitch and Richard T. Harrison

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Richard T. Harrison and Claire M. Leitch

In this chapter the authors adopt a feminist perspective to explore the nature of the identity work undertaken by women in the processes of identity formation and activation, and their resultant behavior in an entrepreneurial context. This chapter extends research on identity work in entrepreneurship that questions the androcentrism inherent in current notions of the entrepreneurial identity. The authors argue that there is scope to more fully enrich our theoretical understanding of identity and identity formation and their relationship to entrepreneurial processes, practices and activities, specifically those communicative practices that shape gender identity formation. They employ an ethnographic case study of a female entrepreneur involved in the start-up and growth of her family’s business. The results demonstrate how identity is co-constituted over time in relation to others, and highlight how it is shaped to fit with an entrepreneurial representation that is inextricable from context.