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  • Author or Editor: Richard J. Cebula x
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Richard J. Cebula

This preliminary empirical study for the year 2010 analyses whether interstate differentials in economic freedom influence the state-level settlement pattern of undocumented immigrants in the U.S. This study also seeks to determine whether the number of sanctuary cities in a state may also have acted as an attraction for undocumented immigrants. In both estimates, the settlement pattern of the undocumented immigrant population appears to be an increasing function of the level of overall economic freedom in a state. The results in this study imply that a one unit higher value for the economic freedom index for a state would, ceteris paribus, be associated with a higher value for the relative size of the undocumented immigrant population in the state in the range of 28 to 33 percent. The evidence in the estimates provided here also indicates that undocumented immigrants are indeed attracted to states having more sanctuary cities.

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Richard J. Cebula

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Richard J. Cebula and Maggie Foley

The chapter seeks to facilitate the teaching and learning of income tax evasion behavior, which is tacitly illegal, by providing a balanced view of the factors that motivate a taxpayer either to comply with the Internal Revenue Code or engage in income tax evasion. The context is one of a cost-benefit analysis. Once the factors that contribute to the costs of tax evasion and those that contribute to the benefits of tax evasion are both identified and quantified, the rational taxpayer decides on which tax behavior on balance best serves her or his interest and acts accordingly.

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Richard J. Cebula and Gordon Tullock

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Edited by Franklin G. Mixon and Richard J. Cebula

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Edited by Franklin G. Mixon and Richard J. Cebula

This innovative book offers targeted strategies for effectively and efficiently teaching economics at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels. It provides professors and other teachers of economics various techniques to engage and retain the interest of students, and challenges them to apply both knowledge and methodological tools to a range of economic problems.
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Daniel L. Bennett and Richard J. Cebula

This chapter examines distorted views of capitalism, challenging the popular view that capitalism is a villainous perpetuator and government a saintly corrector of cronyism and inequality. These misperceptions result not only in a distorted understanding of the institutional structure that underlies capitalism and the mechanisms in which income is distributed, but also lead to perilous reform prescriptions that undermine the ability of capitalism to improve individual and societal well-being. A theory is outlined that links an economy’s institutions to the type of capitalism, entrepreneurship, and inequality to emerge in society. Institutions that constrain the discretionary authority of government incentivize productive entrepreneurship and facilitate free market capitalism, giving rise to a market-determined income distribution and opportunity for economic mobility. An examination of available evidence suggests that countries whose institutions are more consistent with economic freedom exhibit less inequality than those in where government is more prominent.

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Gigi M. Alexander and Richard J. Cebula

Using data on U.S. states, this empirical chapter looks at the impact of labor market freedom on the male labor force participation rate. Using data from the Economic Freedom of North America index in 2010, we find preliminary empirical support for the hypothesis that greater labor market freedom elevates the male labor force participation rate. A one unit increase in labor market freedom is estimated to lead to a 2.51 percent increase in the male labor market participation rate in that state. In addition, we find that greater annual earnings for men by state create an incentive to enter the labor force.

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Edited by Attiat F. Ott and Richard J. Cebula

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Edited by Attiat F. Ott and Richard J. Cebula