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Simon Parker

Parker frames the impact of entrepreneurship from three perspectives: individual, regional and national or global economies. Individual entrepreneurs earn, on average, more than employees and are more socially mobile in some countries. Regional aspects of entrepreneurship highlight to role of agglomeration affects and industry differences while the national view focuses on the entry and exit of new firms and its relationship to productivity and wealth creation. Unsurprisingly, ways to stimulate and support entrepreneurship have been the focus of policies all over the world, a tempting target for future research.
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Simon C. Parker

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Simon C. Parker

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Simon C. Parker

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Simon C. Parker

This research review discusses the role of entrepreneurship in recessions. Simon Parker has selected the key contributions to the literature, which seek to explain why economies enter into and emerge from recession, and the involvement of entrepreneurs in this process. A central theme is the contribution of entrepreneurship to the creation and propagation of business cycles. A combination of theoretical and empirical studies is included, and there is a particular focus on a salient issue which arises in recessions, namely unemployment.
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Simon C. Parker

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Simon C. Parker

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Simon C. Parker

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Raquel Fonseca and Simon C. Parker

Few cross-country comparisons exist on the topic of third age entrepreneurship. We attempt to fill this gap by assembling comparable data on the United States, England and other European countries. Our contribution is threefold. First, we analyze drivers of self-employment among older workers across countries. Second, we investigate the relationship between self-employment rates and age groups, comparing different countries to understand the role played by country-level institutional variables. Third, we discuss policy implications. Key results are as follows. English and American institutions appear not to push older workers into self-employment; Southern Europe’s institutional rigidities and limited opportunities for flexible full-time work at older ages might explain the push into self-employment observed there. Among workers not retired, those wanting part-time work are largely found in self-employment. These facts challenge policy-makers to promote self-employment as an antidote to limited pension coverage and low incomes. Results lead us to suspect that successful entrepreneurship in old age is associated with earlier successful entrepreneurship experience. Hence, policies strengthening business start-up quality are to be encouraged.

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Marton Racz and Simon Parker

This chapter provides a constructive critique of responsible management. It starts by arguing that responsible management does little but extend managerial power and control over employees in more sophisticated ways. Moreover, in terms of enacting change, we argue that problems of limited agency are often overlooked in responsible management research leading to a naïve optimism in the power of individuals and a dismissal of existing political, organizational and cultural contexts. Subsequently, we suggest, via a discussion of the “third wave” of critical management studies and the idea of agonism, ways in which responsible management research could become more critical and more potent. In doing so, we highlight the need for responsible management research to look more at carefully selected collectives rather than individuals, both in the ways in which researchers try to enact change and engage managers and in the way they conceptualize responsibility in the first place.