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Edited by Nick Williams and Tim Vorley

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Nick Williams and Tim Vorley

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Nick Williams and Tim Vorley

This chapter examines how changes to the institutional environment in a crisis-hit economy impact on entrepreneurial activity. Drawing on in-depth interviews with entrepreneurs in Greece, the findings suggest that changes to institutions have served to limit entrepreneurial activity rather than enhance it, and that this has worsened in the midst of the crisis. We argue that this will detrimentally impact Greece’s ability to navigate out of the crisis and regain competitiveness in the longer term. The chapter provides a number of theoretical and policy implications that are focused on improving institutional environments so that entrepreneurship can play an appropriate role in recovering from economic crises.

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Nick Williams and Tim Vorley

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Edited by Nick Williams and Tim Vorley

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Creating Resilient Economies

Entrepreneurship, Growth and Development in Uncertain Times

Edited by Nick Williams and Tim Vorley

Providing a coherent and clear narrative, Creating Resilient Economies offers a theoretical analysis of resilience and provides guidance to policymakers with regards to fostering more resilient economies and people. It adeptly illustrates how resilience thinking can offer the opportunity to re-frame economic development policy and practice and provides a clear evidence base of the cultural, economic, political and social conditions that shape the adaptability, flexibility and responsiveness to crises in their many forms.
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Philip McCann and Tim Vorley

The Productivity Insights Network was established to change the tone of the productivity debate in research, policy and practice. Productivity is a complex multidimensional concept, which despite being the subject of extant research is still not well understood. Since the 2008 global financial crisis, the persistence of flatlining of productivity growth in the UK has come to define what has been termed the productivity puzzle. This introductory chapter highlights the breadth of contributions from the Co-Investigators of the Productivity Insights Network, with each elaborating on different dimensions of the productivity debate.

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Kirsty Newsome and Tim Vorley

This chapter is concerned with exploring the relationship between contemporary work and employment and productivity. It aims to highlight the centrality of the workplace and employment relations for understanding the productivity puzzle. In doing so it explores four aspects of current workplace dynamics, notably: management practice and missing voice; the growth of non-standard work; the performance implications of insecure work; and finally, job quality and the future of work. It concludes by emphasising the importance of engaging with all stakeholders and interests in organisations to secure greater productivity outcomes.

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Tim Vorley and Jen Nelles

Academic debates on productivity have traditionally been dominated by economists using growth accounting frameworks. The productivity slowdown during the last decade has especially highlighted the limitations of these orthodox approaches to explaining the productivity puzzle. In particular, many of the drivers and inhibitors of productivity growth may be related to complex causal relationships which preclude examination by standard growth accounting frameworks, and many of the other potential explanatory factors cannot be incorporated into these frameworks. While other evidence reviews in this volume reflect on the different thematic aspects of the productivity puzzle in the UK this chapter assumes a broader conceptual approach. We argue that while in-depth academic insights may help unpack individual aspects of the productivity puzzle, simply more research of this type is not the answer. Rather, if insights are to meaningfully help governments and institutions better respond to the current productivity challenges there is a compelling argument for thinking about productivity at a systems level. This chapter posits that while existing research is gradually coming to recognise the importance of the intersections to these debates, more innovative and critical thinking is required if research is to impact policy.

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Edited by Philip McCann and Tim Vorley

Productivity Perspectives offers a timely and stimulating social science view on the productivity debate, drawing on the work of the ESRC funded Productivity Insights Network. The book examines the drivers and inhibitors of UK productivity growth in the light of international evidence, and the resulting dramatic slowdown and flatlining of productivity growth in the UK. The reasons for this so-called productivity puzzle are not well understood, and this book advances explanations and insights on these issues from different disciplinary and methodological perspectives. It will be of value to all those interested in, and engaging with, the challenge of slowing productivity growth.