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  • Series: New Horizons in Institutional and Evolutionary Economics series x
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Didier Chabaud and Stéphane Saussier

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Organizational ecology

Markets, Networks and Hierarchies

David N. Barron

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Olivier Favereau, Olivier Biencourt and François Eymard-Duvernay

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Olivier Biencourt and Daniel Urrutiaguer

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Siegwart Lindenberg

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Conclusion: quality is a system proerty. Downstream

Markets, Networks and Hierarchies

Harrison C. White

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Conventions and Structures in Economic Organization

Markets, Networks and Hierarchies

Edited by Olivier Favereau and Emmanuel Lazega

This book contributes to the current rapprochement between economics and sociology. It examines the fact that individuals use rules and interdependencies to forward their own interests, while living in social environments where everyone does the same. The authors argue that to construct durable organizations and viable markets, they need to be able to handle both. However, thus far, economists and sociologists have not been able to reconcile the relationship between these two types of constraints on economic activity.
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Edited by Erik S. Reinert

The expert contributors gathered here approach underdevelopment and inequality from different evolutionary perspectives. It is argued that the Schumpeterian processes of ‘creative destruction’ may take the form of wealth creation in one part of the globe and wealth destruction in another. Case studies explore and analyse the successful 19th century policies that allowed Germany and the United States to catch up with the UK and these are contrasted with two other case studies exploring the deindustrialization and falling real wages in Peru and Mongolia during the 1990s. The case studies and thematic papers together explore, identify and explain the mechanisms which cause economic inequality. Some papers point to why the present form of globalization increases poverty in many Third World nations.