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  • Series: Annals in Entrepreneurship Education series x
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Thomas N. Duening and Matthew L. Metzger

This chapter posits that entrepreneurship education will be enhanced by helping students develop a personal entrepreneurial identity. It articulates a program underway where undergraduate students engage in identity construction through a semester-long project. The project centers on internalizing four specific moral virtues posited to be central to entrepreneurial identity.

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Francine Schlosser, Margaret Cichosz-Grzyb, Martin Croteau, Donovan Dill, Valerie Fox and Annette Markvoort

Key stakeholders in Canadian business, government and academia have recognized that improving Canada’s entrepreneurial culture is critical to becoming more globally competitive, and that Canada’s academic institutions must be an important part of the solution. The Campus-linked Accelerator Program provides an example of a deliberate government policy to develop and connect a treasure-trove of highly innovative youth to scalable economic enterprise development. Through this program, a myriad of new initiatives are emerging on Ontario campuses, including outreach campaigns, experiential learning opportunities, mentorship programs and startup accelerators.

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Gene Poor and Kirk Kern

Social media has evolved into an extremely powerful two-way marketing tool for business, industry and especially entrepreneurs. The power of social media lies in its ability to both engage and connect people who have similar interests and might otherwise never meet. In spite of nearly 20 years of development and incredible accomplishments, it is still in its infancy and in a constant state of flux. This chapter captures Bowling Green State University’s journey in incorporating social media in all aspects of their curriculum and activities.

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Edited by Michael H. Morris and Eric Liguori

The second edition of Annals of Entrepreneurship Education and Pedagogy provides entirely new insights into a number of the leading issues surrounding the teaching of entrepreneurship and the building of entrepreneurship programs. Prepared under the auspices of the United States Association for Small Business and Entrepreneurship (USASBE), this book features fifteen scholarly perspectives on a range of entrepreneurship education issues.
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Edited by Charles H. Matthews and Eric W. Liguori

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Edited by Charles H. Matthews and Eric W. Liguori

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Bill Aulet, Andrew Hargadon, Luke Pittaway, Candida Brush and Sharon Alpi

One of the most commented on and, arguably, acclaimed, contributions of the last volume of USASBE’s Annals of Entrepreneurship Education and Pedagogy was the entry titled “What I’ve Learned About Teaching Entrepreneurship: Perspectives of Five Master Educators” authored by Jerome Engel, Minet Schindehutte, Heidi Neck, Ray Smilor, and Bill Rossi. Engel and colleagues took time to practice deep reflection on their experiences teaching entrepreneurship and then translated their learnings into deeply meaningful insights for the field to draw from. In planning this volume, the editors believed it was important to build upon this work, so we invited five new entrepreneurship educators to share what they have learned about teaching entrepreneurship. Again, we reached out to faculty members acknowledged by their peers, leading academic organizations, their institutions, and their students to be among the very best in entrepreneurship education. And again, each of these individuals has over a decade of experience in the entrepreneurship classroom and has witnessed the rapid evolution of a very dynamic discipline. In the pages that follow Bill Aulet, Andrew Hargadon, Luke Pittaway, Candida Brush, and Sharon Alpi share their reflections on decades of cumulative experience both inside and outside the classroom.

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Pat Dickson

Our understanding of history is shaped not only by our knowledge of the factual events of the past but also our perceptions of those events. It is our perceptions that help us make sense of what has happened and allow us to apply what we have learned from the past in the present. The following discussion is intended as an interpretive history of a remarkable organization, the United States Association for Small Business and Entrepreneurship. The purpose is not to provide a treatise but rather a selective view of the perceptions of a number of individuals privileged to hold leadership positions in the organization. The discussion begins with an overview of a number of strategic pivots taken by the leadership of the organization during particularly challenging times since just before and following the national economic crisis of 2008. The discussion is augmented by the personal recollections of three United States Association for Small Business and Entrepreneurship (USASBE) presidents who led the organization during particularly eventful periods. Jeffrey Alves, President in 2008, provides a broad perspective regarding what he views as the key strategic pivot points leading up to and following his time both as President and as a long-serving board member. Jeff Cornwall, President in 2010, presents a personal recollection of the events leading up to his decision to accept the nomination as President and the challenges the organization faced in the aftermath of the U.S. economic crisis. Finally, Heidi Neck, President in 2017, reviews a more recent period of the organization’s history. She details a significant strategic pivot made by the organization, not in response to a financial crisis, but rather in response to a crisis of strategic identity.

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Nawaf Alabduljader, Ravi S. Ramani and George T. Solomon

An overview of the state of the field of entrepreneurship education in the United States (U.S.), its attempts to differentiate itself from traditional business education, and the curricular confusion between high growth potential ventures (HGPV) and small business or steady state growth ventures (SBGV) is examined. This review and discussion also include an analytical examination of the results of a survey of 105 U.S. four-year colleges and universities that offer entrepreneurship programs. Our analysis compares and contrasts institutions that differentiate between high growth potential ventures and small business or steady state growth ventures and those programs that do not make this distinction across eight key areas: (1) program types, (2) courses offered, (3) course content, (4) student enrollment, (5) activities and resources available, (6) sources of funding, (7) pedagogical approaches, and (8) learning materials used. Although small businesses are by far the most popular type of firm in the U. S., our analysis suggests a relative lack of focus on a curriculum focused on small business or steady state growth ventures. Moreover, the results reveal a high degree of overlap in the curriculum between education aimed at promoting high growth potential ventures and education aimed at developing small business growth ventures, indicating that educational offerings have not sufficiently differentiated between these two endeavors. Implications of these results for the field of entrepreneurship education are discussed.