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  • Series: New Horizons in Innovation Management series x
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Fariborz Damanpour

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Fariborz Damanpour

Chapter 1 provides an overview of research on innovation in organizations. Innovation is defined from economic and social perspectives – two primary theoretical views in the study of innovation in organizations. Two approaches for research on organizational innovation – competition–wealth and adaptation–progression – are also introduced. These approaches assist in framing research on innovations in organizations and guide discussing the antecedents and performance consequences of the generation and adoption of organizational innovation. The primary elements of innovation – type of innovation, innovation radicalness, innovation process, openness of innovation process – are discussed. In addition, four primary dimensions of sources (causes, drivers) of organizational innovation – environmental factors, organizational factors, individual (leadership, employee) factors, and innovation characteristics – are presented. The main features of each element and source are defined and discussed. The chapter ends by describing the structure of the book and provides a summary of each chapter.

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Fariborz Damanpour

The concept of innovation overlaps with creativity, invention, and change; its meaning and purpose varies across disciplinary fields; and its empirical examination is contingent on a study’s context. Conceptual and contextual diversity burdens learning about drivers, processes, and consequences of innovation across disciplinary fields. This chapter draws the peripheries of innovation from its related concepts and maps disciplinary differences in studies of innovation. First, innovation is distinguished from technology, invention, creativity, and organizational and technological change. Then, two sets of theoretical perspectives, economic-oriented and social/behavioral-oriented, through which research on organizational innovation is explained and understood, are discussed. Third, contextual differences in innovation studies are illustrated via pairs of organizational types, business–public, small–large, manufacturing–service, and start-up–incumbent, and possible research questions are proposed.

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Albert N. Link and Zachary T. Oliver

This chapter presents a theoretical model of the economics of technology transfer. The model is based on downside risk.

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Albert N. Link and Zachary T. Oliver

This chapter presents empirical evidence at the aggregate level of the effectiveness of US technology transfer policies. The correlation between US federal R & D investments and US productivity growth forms the basis of the effectiveness analysis.

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Albert N. Link and Zachary T. Oliver

This chapter summarized the academic and policy literature on US federal laboratory and federal agency technology transfer. Emphasis is placed on empirical evidence from the literature.

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Albert N. Link and Zachary T. Oliver

This chapter discusses the various technology transfer mechanisms and metrics that characterize US technology transfer. Emphasis is on patents, licenses, and CRADAs. Also, public domain US data on technology transfer mechanisms and associated metrics are presented.

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Albert N. Link and Zachary T. Oliver

This chapter presents descriptive empirical information on the growth rates of selected US technology transfer mechanisms. Emphasis is on patents, licenses, and CRADAs.

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Albert N. Link and Zachary T. Oliver

This chapter presents examples of successful technology transfers for 11 US agencies. These are agency-reported examples; they illustrated the scope of technologies that have been transferred to the private sector.

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Albert N. Link and Zachary T. Oliver

This chapter focuses on US agency patents as an example of the transfer of technical knowledge. The framework for the empirical analysis is a knowledge production function. The knowledge production function is generally viewed as the appropriate framework for the study of patents.