Handbook of Regions and Competitiveness
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Handbook of Regions and Competitiveness

Contemporary Theories and Perspectives on Economic Development

Edited by Robert Huggins and Piers Thompson

The aim of this Handbook is to take stock of regional competitiveness and complementary concepts as a means of presenting a state-of-the-art discussion of the contemporary theories, perspectives and empirical explanations that help make sense of the determinants of uneven development across regions. Drawing on an international field of leading scholars, the book is assembled and organized so that readers can first learn about the theoretical underpinnings of regional competitiveness and development theory, before moving on to deeper discussions of key factors and principal elements, the emergence of allied concepts, empirical applications, and the policy context.
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Chapter 14: Regional resilience in Italy: do employment and income tell the same story?

Roberto Cellini, Paolo Di Caro and Gianpiero Torrisi

Abstract

The concept of resilience has attracted increasing interest in regional economics. In the flourishing literature, however, results are mixed, even when referring to the same case study. This mixed evidence stems also from different operationalization of the multifaceted resilience concept; the main difference being between studies using gross domestic product (GDP) series and those measuring regional economic performance in terms of fluctuations in employment levels. It is important, therefore, to address what kind of relationship – if any – exists between the two measures. To this end, the chapter analyses and compares results concerning regional resilience in Italy over the last 40 years, focusing on the differences deriving from the choice between the two aforementioned measures. The analysis reveals that the information contained in the different series are not alternative and overlapping but complementary.

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